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Facts about Amun

Amun

The increasing importance of Amun can be strongly tied to the political fortunes of the Theban nome during this period of the Egyptian dynastic history.

Amun

Amun also came to be associated with various ram-headed deities that were popular in Egypt (and surrounding areas) at the time.

Amun

In areas outside of Egypt, where the Egyptians had previously brought the worship of Amun, the decline in the god's prestige was neither so precipitous nor so dire.

Amun

Consequently, Amun came to be seen as a benevolent defender of the disadvantaged, and came to be titled Vizier of the Poor.

Amun

Given their association with fertility, Amun also began to absorb the identity of Min (a god representing sexual potency), becoming Amun-Min.

Amun

Some scholars have noted a strong linguistic parallel between the names of Amun (/Amen) and Min, an ancient deity who shared many areas of patronage and influence with his more popular contemporary.

Amun

During this age, Amun was also assigned a female companion (aside from Amunet, who is better characterized as the god's own female aspect).

Amun

The name of Amun came to be incorporated in the monikers of many rulers from this dynasty, such as Amenemhe (founder of the twelfth dynasty (1991-1802 B.C.E.

Amun

When the Theban royal family of the seventeenth dynasty drove out the Hyksos, Amun, as the god of the royal city, was again prominent.

image: n7.alamy.com
Amun

that Amun began to assume the proportions of a universal god for the Egyptians, eclipsing (or becoming syncretized with) most other deities and asserting his power over the gods of foreign lands.

Amun

Amun (also spelled Amon, Amen; Greek: ????? Ammon, and ????? Hammon; Egyptian: Yamanu) was a multifaceted deity whose cult originated at Thebes, in the Upper Kingdom of classical Egypt.

Amun

Several extant English words have been derived from the name of Amun (via the Greek form "Ammon"), including ammonia and ammonite.

Amun

Such was its reputation among the Greeks that Alexander the Great journeyed there after the battle of Issus, in order to be acknowledged as the son of Amun.

Amun

After the dissolution of the fragile alliance between North and South, Amun gradually faded into relative obscurity, eclipsed by the increasingly popular veneration of Osiris, Horus, and Isis.

Amun

Amun was, to begin with, the local deity of Thebes, when it was an unimportant town on the east bank of the river, about the region now occupied by the Temple of Karnak.

Amun

Amun's name is first attested to in Egyptian records as imn, which can be translated as "the Hidden (One).

Amun

Given the oppression of the Egyptians under their Hyksos rulers, their victory (which was attributed to the supreme god Amun) was seen as the god's championing of the less fortunate.

Amun

Consequently, Amun came to be seen as a benevolent defender of the disadvantaged, and came to be titled Vizier of the Poor.