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Facts about Archaea

Archaea

Archaea have no murein in their cell walls.

Archaea

Archaea can reproduce using binary and multiple fission, fragmentation, and budding.

Archaea

Archaea are similar to other prokaryotes in most aspects of cell structure and metabolism.

Archaea

The relationship between Archaea and Eukarya remains an important problem.

image: cnx.org
Archaea

Recently, several studies have shown that archaea exist not only in mesophilic and thermophilic (and hyperthermophic) environments but are also present, sometimes in high numbers, at low temperatures as well.

Archaea

Many methanogenic archaea are found in the digestive tracts of animals such as ruminants, termites, and humans.

Archaea

Archaea comes from the Greek ??????, meaning "ancient ones."

Archaea

Recently, a species of flat, square archaean that lives in hypersaline pools has been discovered (Burns et al.

Archaea

The enzymes isolated from some extremophile archaea have proven to be of great use in the biotechnology industry, able to function under conditions that would denature enzymes taken from most "normal" organisms.

Archaea

Like bacteria and eukaryotes, archaea possess glycerol-based phospholipids.

Archaea

Archaeans also have flagella that are notably different in composition and development from the superficially similar flagella of bacteria.

Archaea

The name archaean has been used both for a single organism and as an adjective.

Archaea

Archaea were originally described in extreme environments, but have since been found in many types of habitat.

Archaea

Many archaeans are extremophiles (thrive in or require "extreme" conditions that would exceed optimal conditions for growth and reproduction in the majority of organisms).

Archaea

The biological term, Archaea, should not be confused with the geologic phrase Archean eon, also known as the Archeozoic era.

Archaea

Many archaeal tRNA and rRNA genes harbor unique archaeal introns, which are neither like eukaryotic introns, nor like bacterial (type I and type II) introns.

Archaea

Perhaps even more significant are the large numbers of archaea found throughout most of the world's oceans, a predominantly cold environment (Giovannoni and Stingl 2005).

Archaea

Woese argued that the bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes each represent a primary line of descent that diverged early on from an ancestral progenote with poorly-developed genetic machinery.

Archaea

Like bacteria, archaea are single-celled organisms lacking nuclei and are therefore prokaryotes.

Archaea

Of note, the halobacteria can use light to produce ATP, although no archaea conduct photosynthesis with an electron transport chain, as occurs in other groups.

Archaea

No clear examples of archaean pathogens are known (Eckburg 2003, Cavicchioli et al.

Archaea

Several other characteristics also set the Archaea apart.

Archaea

Archaeans also exhibit a variety of different types of metabolism.

Archaea

Archaea are divided into two main taxonomic groups, the Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeota, based on descent trees for ribosomal RNA.

Archaea

Archaea are usually placed into three groups based on preferred habitat.

Archaea

Archaea or Archaebacteria is a major division of living organisms, as well as the name of the members of this group, which in singular form are known as archaeon, archaeum, or archaean.

The other two Domains being "Bacteria" and "Eukarya" (which includes us humans). Archaebacteria are characterized by having different cell call components, coenzymes and RNA Sequences compared to bacteria. ... Eubacteria have a rigid cell wall. However, they can be both gram positive and gram-negative.

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