A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Facts about Bioluminescence

Bioluminescence

The cookiecutter shark uses bioluminescence for camouflage, but a small patch on its underbelly remains dark and appears as a small fish to large predatory fish like tuna and mackerel.

Bioluminescence

Bioluminescence is the production and emission of light by a living organism as the result of a chemical reaction during which chemical energy is converted to light energy.

Bioluminescence

Bioluminescence occurs in a great diversity of taxa, including bacteria, fungi, dinoflagellates, annelids, ctenophores (comb jellies), cnidarians (jellyfish), mollusks, crustaceans, echinoderms, and insects, and fish.

Bioluminescence

Bioluminescence should not be confused with fluorescence or phosphorescence.

Bioluminescence

The term bioluminescence originates from the Greek bios for "living" and the Latin lumen for "light."

image: cf.ydcdn.net
Bioluminescence

The honey mushroom attracts insects using bioluminescence so that the insects will help disseminate the fungus' spores into the environment.

Bioluminescence

Bioluminescence is generated by an enzyme-catalyzed chemoluminescence reaction, wherein the pigment luciferin is oxidized by the enzyme luciferase.

Bioluminescence

Some crustaceans send out coded messages by bioluminescence to their own species when it is time to mate (Haddock et al.

Bioluminescence

All cells produce some form of bioluminescence within the electromagnetic spectrum, but most is neither visible nor noticeable to the naked eye.

image: i.pinimg.com
Bioluminescence

Bioluminescence is used as a lure to attract prey by several deep sea fish, such as the anglerfish.

Bioluminescence

Luciferase systems have also been harnessed for biomedical research using bioluminescence imaging.

image: i.imgur.com
Bioluminescence

Bioluminescence is thought to play a direct role in communication between bacteria.

Bioluminescence

Every organism's bioluminescence is unique in wavelength, duration, timing, and regularity of flashes.

Bioluminescence

Bioluminescence aids the survival and reproduction of individual organisms through such means as camouflage and defense, attraction of prey and mates, and communication.

Bioluminescence

Bioluminescence is primarily a marine phenomena, especially at mid-ocean depths.

Bioluminescence

Below follows a list of organisms which have been observed to have visible bioluminescence.

Bioluminescence

Bioluminescence is the predominate source of light in the deep ocean (Haddock et al.

Bioluminescence

Vibrio symbiosis with numerous marine invertebrates and fish, namely the Hawaiian Bobtail Squid (Euprymna scolopes) is a key model organism for symbiosis, quorum sensing, and bioluminescence.

Bioluminescence

In bacteria, the expression of genes related to bioluminescence is controlled by an operon (key nucleotide sequence) called the Lux operon.