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Facts about Boudica

Boudica

Boudica exhorted her troops from her chariot, her daughters beside her.

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Boudica

Dio says that even if they were lined up one deep, they would not have extended the length of Boudica's line.

Boudica

Many believe that Boudica herself is buried under one of the platforms at King's Cross railway station.

Boudica

Boudica's husband, Prasutagus, was the king of Iceni.

Boudica

Her name takes many forms in various manuscripts, but was almost certainly originally Boudicca or Boudica, derived from the Celtic word *bouda, victory (cf.

Boudica

Boudica's army then burned the 20-year-old settlement of Londinium (London) to the ground and destroyed Verulamium (Saint Albans), killing an estimated 70,000-80,000 people.

Boudica

Boudica chided the men that if they wanted to live in slavery, that was their choice, goading them to fight with all they had.

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Boudica

Boudica's army fell on the poorly defended city and destroyed it.

Boudica

By the Middle Ages, before the telescope was invented, more people began to recognize the Moon as a sphere, though they believed it was "perfectly smooth."

Boudica

Until the late twentieh century, Boudica was known as Boadicea, which is probably derived from a mistranscription when a manuscript of Tacitus was copied in the Middle Ages.

Boudica

The name is attested in inscriptions as "Boudica" in Lusitania, "Boudiga" in Bordeaux and "Bodicca" in Britain.

Boudica

The narrowness of the field meant that Boudica could only put forth as many troops as the Romans could at a given time.

Boudica

Based on later development of Welsh and Irish, Kenneth Jackson concludes that the correct spelling of the name is Boudica, pronounced /b??'di?.ka:/, although it is mispronounced by many as /bu?.dik'?/.

Boudica

Some say that Boudica was a high priestess of Andraste.

Boudica

The site of Boudica's final battle is unknown.

Boudica

When the Roman soldiers had used up their javelins, they were able to engage Boudica's second wave in the open.

Boudica

Boudica has since remained an important cultural symbol in the United Kingdom.

Boudica

Boudica's story was included in Raphael Holinshed's Chronicles and inspired Shakespeare's younger contemporaries Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher to write a play, "Bonduca" in 1610.

Boudica

Tacitus and Dio agree that Boudica was of royal descent.

Boudica

Dio says that at the outset Boudica employed a form of divination.