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Facts about Cassowaries

Cassowaries

Adult Southern Cassowaries are 1.5 to 1.8 meters (59–71 inches) tall, although some females may reach 2 meters (79 inches) (Panse 2006) and weigh 58.5 kilograms (129 lb) (Davies 2002).

Cassowaries

Remaining causes of death included hunting (5 cases), entanglement in wire (1 case), the removal of cassowaries that attacked humans (4 cases), and natural causes (18 cases), including tuberculosis (4 cases).

Cassowaries

Cassowaries provide important ecological functions, acting as a keystone species in rain forests by consuming fallen fruit and dispersing the seeds.

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Cassowaries

The northern and dwarf cassowaries are not well known.

Cassowaries

Cassowaries can run up to 50 kilometers/hour (31 miles per hour) through the dense forest.

Cassowaries

All cassowaries have feathers that consist of a shaft and loose barbules.

Cassowaries

Cassowaries are very shy, but when disturbed, they are capable of inflicting serious injuries to dogs and children, and have been called the most dangerous bird on the planet.

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Cassowaries

Cassowaries are solitary birds except during courtship, egg-laying, and sometimes around ample food supplies (Davies 2003).

Cassowaries

About 75 percent of these were from cassowaries that had been fed by people.

Cassowaries

All cassowaries are usually shy birds of the deep forest, adept at disappearing long before a human knows they are there.

Cassowaries

Cassowaries are native to the humid rainforests of New Guinea and nearby smaller islands, and northeastern Australia (Clements 2007).

Cassowaries

Cassowaries feed on the fruits of several hundred rainforest species and usually pass viable seeds in large dense scats.

Cassowaries

Contact with humans encourages cassowaries to take most unsuitable food from picnic tables.

Cassowaries

Cassowaries have a reputation for being dangerous to people and domestic animals.

Cassowaries

Cassowaries are large birds, with females tending to be bigger and more brightly colored.

Cassowaries

Cassowaries have small wings with 5 to 6 large remeges (flight feathers).

Cassowaries

The evolutionary history of cassowaries, as of all ratites, is not well known.

Cassowaries

Hand feeding of cassowaries poses a big threat to their survival (Borrell 2008).