A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Facts about Cassowary

Cassowary

The name cassowary comes from the Malay name kesuari (Gotch 1995).

Cassowary

A fossil species was reported from Australia, but for reasons of biogeography this assignment is not certain and it might belong to the prehistoric "emuwaries," Emuarius, which were cassowary-like primitive emus.

Cassowary

The one documented human death caused by a cassowary was that of Phillip Mclean, aged 16 years old, and it happened on April 6, 1926.

image: i.imgur.com
Cassowary

Cassowary attacks occur every year in Queensland, Australia.

image: i.ytimg.com
Cassowary

Cassowary strikes to the abdomen are among the rarest of all, but there is one case of a dog that was kicked in the belly in 1995.

Cassowary

Germination rates for seeds of the rare Australian rainforest tree Ryparosa were found to be much higher after passing through a cassowary's gut (92 versus 4 percent) (Weber and Woodrow 2004).

Cassowary

Cassowaries are largely frugivorous; fallen fruit, such as the cassowary plum and fruit on low branches is the mainstay of their diet.

Cassowary

The 2007 edition of the Guinness World Records lists the cassowary as the world's most dangerous bird.

Cassowary

The southern cassowary (Casuarius casuarius) is the third largest flightless bird on the planet, smaller only than the ostrich and emu.

image: dl.id.au
Cassowary

The southern cassowary is endangered in Queensland, Australia.

Related Types