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Facts about Cesium

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Cesium hydroxide is an extremely strong base and can attack glass.

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On the other hand, such amounts would not ordinarily be encountered in nature, so cesium is not a major chemical environmental pollutant.

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Along with gallium, francium, and mercury, cesium is among the few metals that are liquid at or near room temperature.

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The resulting cesium chloride salt is purified by recrystallization.

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The reaction with water produces cesium hydroxide (CsOH), an extremely strong chemical base that will rapidly etch the surface of glass.

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Cesium is the most electropositive and most alkaline of the stable chemical elements.

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Cesium carbonate: Cesium carbonate is a white crystalline solid, with the chemical formula Cs2CO3.

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Cesium-137 is produced during the detonation of nuclear weapons and in nuclear power plants.

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Cesium occurs in several minerals, particularly lepidolite and pollucite (a hydrated silicate of aluminum and cesium).

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Cesium is the least abundant of the five nonradioactive alkali metals.

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Cesium has at least 39 known isotopes, which is more than any other element except francium.

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All cesium compounds should be regarded as mildly toxic, because of its chemical similarity to potassium.

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Cesium (also spelled caesium, chemical symbol Cs, atomic number 55) is a member of the group of chemical elements known as alkali metals.

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Cesium was discovered by Robert Bunsen and Gustav Kirchhoff in 1860, when they analyzed the spectrum of mineral water obtained from D—Ćrkheim, Germany.

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Exceptionally pure, gas-free cesium can be made by decomposing cesium azide with heat.

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Cesium chloride: Cesium chloride (CsCl) is an ionic compound.

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Bunsen isolated cesium salts from the spring water, and the metal itself was isolated in 1881 by Carl Setterberg, who worked in Bunsen's laboratory.

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Cesium is a catalyst for certain reactions in organic chemistry.

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Cesium-137 is commonly used in industry for such applications as moisture density gauges, leveling gauges, and thickness gauges.

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Metallic cesium can be isolated by the electrolysis of fused (molten) cesium cyanide, as well as in several other ways.

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Radioactive cesium does not accumulate in the body as effectively as many other fission products, such as radioactive iodine or strontium.

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Rats fed with cesium in place of potassium in their diet were found to die, so this element cannot replace potassium in function.

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Some of its radioactive isotopes are used to treat certain types of cancer, and cesium-134 helps measure cesium output by the nuclear power industry.