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Facts about Chlorophyll

Chlorophyll

Historically, red algae have been assumed to have chlorophyll d, although it could not be isolated from all species and even different collections of the same species.

Chlorophyll

Other chemical variations of chlorophyll are found in photosynthetic bacteria, other than cyanobacteria (sometimes called blue-green algae).

Chlorophyll

All other known eukaryotes and cyanobacteria use chlorophyll a.

Chlorophyll

Chlorophyll, via its central role in photosynthesis, reflects harmony on both the sub-cellular and macro levels.

Chlorophyll

The photosystem reaction centers consist of a "special pair" of chlorophyll a molecules that are characterized by their specific absorption maximum.

Chlorophyll

Some algae, such as brown algae and diatoms, use chlorophyll c as a substitute for chlorophyll b.

Chlorophyll

When either of the two chorophyll a molecules at the reaction center absorb energy, an electron is excited and transferred to an electron-acceptor molecule, leaving an electron hole in the donor chlorophyll.

Chlorophyll

Chlorophyll's name is derived from ancient Greek: chloros = green and phyllon = leaf.

Chlorophyll

Purple bacteria use bacteriochlorophyll, which absorbs infrared light between 800 to 1000 nanometers, and the green sulphur bacteria use chlorobium chlorophyll.

Chlorophyll

When tested with iodine solution, a color change revealing the presence of starch occurs only in regions of the leaf that were green and therefore contained chlorophyll.

Chlorophyll

Chlorophyll is an essential component of photosynthesis, which helps plants get energy from light.

Chlorophyll

Chlorophyll a is common to all eukaryotic photosynthetic organisms, and, due to its central role in the reaction center, is essential for photosynthesis.

Chlorophyll

The carotenoids also play a role as antioxidants, and serve to reduce photo-oxidative damage to chlorophyll molecules.

Chlorophyll

Chlorophyll absorbs most strongly in the blue and to a lesser extent red portions of the electromagnetic spectrum.

Chlorophyll

Chlorophyll is a green photosynthetic pigment found in plants, algae, and cyanobacteria.

Chlorophyll

The accessory pigments such as chlorophyll b and carotenoids are not essential.

Chlorophyll

Each antenna complex has between 250 and 400 pigment molecules, and the energy they absorb is shuttled by resonance energy transfer to a specialized chlorophyll a at the reaction center of each photosystem.

Chlorophyll

The P is short for pigment, and the number is the specific absorption peak in nanometers for the chlorophyll molecules in each reaction center.

Chlorophyll

The antenna pigments are predominantly chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, absorbing violet-blue and red light, respectively, and carotenoids.

Chlorophyll

All known bacteria with bacteriochlorophyll have a form of photosynthesis that does not involve evolution of oxygen and so are called anoxyphotobacteria.