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Facts about Cobalt

Cobalt

Cobalt in small amounts is essential to many living organisms, including humans.

Cobalt

The radioactive isotope cobalt-60 (Co-60 or 60Co) is used in radiotherapy.

Cobalt

In 1938, John Livingood and Glenn Seaborg discovered the radioisotope cobalt-60.

image: www2.lbl.gov
Cobalt

Naturally occurring cobalt is composed of one stable isotope, 59Co.

Cobalt

Cobalt compounds are used in the production of inks, paints, and varnishes.

Cobalt

Metallic cobalt commonly presents a mixture of two crystallographic structures: "hcp" and "fcc."

Cobalt

The world's major producers of cobalt are the Democratic Republic of the Congo, China, Zambia, Russia, and Australia.

Cobalt

Cobalt compounds have been used for centuries to impart a rich blue color to glass, glazes, and ceramics.

Cobalt

The word cobalt is derived from the German kobalt, from kobold meaning "goblin."

Cobalt

Cobalt is frequently associated with nickel, and both are characteristic ingredients of meteoric iron.

Cobalt

Cobalt(II) salts form the red-pink 2+ complex in aqueous solution.

Cobalt

Cobalt is not found as a free metal but is generally found in the form of ores.

Cobalt

Cobalt-60 is useful as a gamma-ray source partially because it can be produced—in known quantity and large amounts—by simply exposing natural cobalt to neutrons in a reactor for a given time.

Cobalt

Ingestion of 60Co leads to incorporation of some cobalt into tissues, which is released very slowly.

Cobalt

Swedish chemist Georg Brandt (1694–1768) is credited with isolating cobalt sometime between 1730 and 1737.

Cobalt

In chemistry, cobalt is a member of a group of transition metals.

Cobalt

The +2 and +3 oxidation states are most prevalent, but cobalt(I) complexes are also fairly common.

Cobalt

Cobalt (chemical symbol Co, atomic number 27) is a hard, lustrous, silver-gray metal.

Cobalt

Cobalt is a central component of the vitamin cobalamin, or vitamin B-12.

Cobalt

Powdered cobalt in metal form is a fire hazard.

Cobalt

The isotopes of cobalt range in atomic weight from 50 amu (50Co) to 73 amu (73Co).

Cobalt

Such a weapon is sometimes called a dirty bomb or cobalt bomb, which a leading scientist predicted as being capable of wiping out all life on earth.

Cobalt

During the nineteenth century, cobalt blue was produced at the Norwegian Blaafarvevжrket (70-80 percent of world production), led by the Prussian industrialist Benjamin Wegner.

Cobalt

Cobalt compounds should be handled with care due to cobalt's slight toxicity.

Cobalt

Miners used this term for the ore of cobalt, because they thought it worthless and found that it was poisonous and degraded other mined elements.

Cobalt

Like iron, cobalt can be magnetized and converted into a permanent magnet.

Cobalt

The presence of 0.13 to 0.30 mg/kg of cobalt in soils markedly improves the health of grazing animals.