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Facts about Donkey

Donkey

Donkey colors vary from the most common dun (grayish brown), from which the word "donkey" comes, to reddish, white, black, and spotted (IMH 2006).

Donkey

Some researchers think the real number is higher since many donkeys go uncounted.

Donkey

Once a person has earned their confidence, donkeys can be willing and companionable partners and very dependable in work and recreation.

Donkey

In ancient Rome, donkeys were used as sacrificial animals.

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Donkey

Some taxonomic schemes list the donkey as its own species, Equus asinus, and the African wild ass as Equus africanus.

Donkey

Over time this gave rise to the domesticated donkey.

image: etc.usf.edu
Donkey

Most donkeys (probably over 95 percent) are used for the same types of work that they have been doing for six thousand years.

Donkey

The mating of a male horse and a female donkey produces a hinny.

Donkey

The word donkey and ass refers to the domesticated taxonomic group.

Donkey

Donkeys have a reputation for stubbornness, but much of this is due to some handlers' misinterpretation of their highly-developed sense of self-preservation.

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Donkey

Cold and rain, however, are problems for them and donkeys in cooler, wetter climates need shelter from bad weather.

Donkey

The number of donkeys in the world continues to grow, as it has steadily throughout most of history.

Donkey

The average donkey is somewhat smaller than its wild ancestors, standing 90 to 120 cm (3 to 4 feet) tall at the shoulder.

Donkey

Soon after the domesticated horse was introduced to the Middle East, around 1500 B.C.E., donkeys and horses began to be bred together, giving birth to mules (offspring of male donkey and female horse).

Donkey

The first evidence of the donkey comes from Egypt around 4000 B.C.E.

Donkey

Donkeys became important pack animals for people living in the Egyptian and Nubian regions and were also used to pull plows and for milk and meat.

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Donkey

The largest is the Donkey Sanctuary of England, which also supports donkey welfare projects in Egypt, Ethiopia, India, Kenya, and Mexico (DS 2006).

Donkey

In 43 C.E., the Romans brought the first donkeys to Britain (DS 2006).

Donkey

Donkeys, along with horses and mules, gradually spread around the world.

Donkey

Donkeys have become much slower with domestication and very rarely break into a gallop.

Donkey

In 1495, the donkey was introduced to the New World by Columbus.

Donkey

Other donkeys are used to sire mules, as companions for horses, to guard sheep, and as pets.

Donkey

According to the Bible, Jesus rode into Jerusalem on a donkey, fulfilling an Old Testament prophecy.

Donkey

A mule is the offspring of a male donkey and a female horse.

Donkey

By 1800 B.C.E., donkeys had reached the Middle East where the trading city of Damascus was referred to as the “City of Asses” in cuneiform texts.

Donkey

Donkeys have an advantage over oxen as work animals in that they do not have to stop and ruminate (Blench 2000).

Donkey

Syria produced at least three breeds of donkeys, including a saddle breed with a graceful, easy gait.

Donkey

In ancient Greece, the donkey was associated with Dionysus, the god of wine.

Donkey

A male donkey is called a jack,, a female a jennet or jenny, and a baby a colt.

Donkey

The donkey or ass, Equus asinus, is a member of the horse family, Equidae, of the order Perissodactyla, odd-toed ungulates (hoofed mammals).

Donkey

Some researchers think the real number is higher since many donkeys go uncounted.

Later, famed cartoonist Thomas Nast used the donkey in his newspaper cartoons, helping to establish it as the symbol of the Democratic Party. And it was Nast who provided the Republicans with their elephant. ... In an 1874 cartoon, Nast drew a donkey clothed in a lion's skin - scaring off the other animals at the zoo.Aug 26, 2012

The origins of the Democratic donkey can be traced to the 1828 presidential campaign of Andrew Jackson. During that race, opponents of Jackson called him a jackass. ... In the 1870s, influential political cartoonist Thomas Nast helped popularize the donkey as a symbol for the entire Democratic Party.Jul 7, 2015

"The Third-Term Panic," by Thomas Nast, was originally published in "Harper's Magazine" in 1874 and is considered the point when the donkey and elephant came to symbolize the two parties. In U.S. politics, the Democratic Party has been represented by a donkey and the Republican Party by an elephant for decades.Nov 6, 2012

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