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Facts about Ebola

Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) is a rare and deadly disease most commonly affecting people and nonhuman primates (monkeys, gorillas, and chimpanzees). It is caused by an infection with one of five known Ebola virus species, four of which can cause disease in people: Ebola virus (Zaire ebolavirus)Dec 27, 2017

Avoid funeral or burial rituals that require handling the body of someone who has died from Ebola. Avoid contact with bats and nonhuman primates or blood, fluids, and raw meat prepared from these animals. Avoid facilities in West Africa where Ebola patients are being treated.Jul 22, 2015

Experimental vaccines and treatments for Ebola are under development, but they have not yet been fully tested for safety or effectiveness. Recovery from Ebola depends on good supportive care and the patient's immune response. ... Even after recovery, Ebola might be found in some body fluids, including semen.Jul 22, 2015

The Ebola virus outbreak that's ravaging West Africa probably started with a single infected person, a new genetic analysis shows. This West African variant can be traced genetically to a single introduction, perhaps a person infected by a bat, researchers report in the journal Science.Aug 28, 2014

In this article. Ebola is a rare but deadly virus that causes fever, body aches, and diarrhea, and sometimes bleeding inside and outside the body. As the virus spreads through the body, it damages the immune system and organs. Ultimately, it causes levels of blood-clotting cells to drop.Oct 1, 2016

Ebola virus disease (EVD), also known as Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF) or simply Ebola, is a viral hemorrhagic fever of humans and other primates caused by ebolaviruses. ... The virus spreads by direct contact with body fluids, such as blood, of an infected human or other animals.

Ebola generally starts with flu-like symptoms. Though it's known for the extreme hemorrhagic symptoms -- the bleeding out of the eyes, etc. -- not everyone will experience these. ... People who die from infection with Ebola virus usually end up dying from multi-organ failure and shock.Aug 2, 2014

At least two of these fruit bat species are also found in Guinea — which is where the current Ebola outbreak in West Africa began — so it's possible that these bats were sources for the outbreak, Gatherer told Live Science.Sep 22, 2014

Ebola virus disease (EVD) first appeared in 1976 in 2 simultaneous outbreaks, one in what is now, Nzara, South Sudan, and the other in Yambuku, Democratic Republic of Congo. The latter occurred in a village near the Ebola River, from which the disease takes its name.

When Ebola virus came for the first time to a small village in Guinea, the victim was a toddler, who later became known to the world as Patient Zero. He died on Dec. 6, 2013, at age 2, and the domino effect of his illness has spiraled into the outbreak currently ravaging three nations in West Africa.Oct 30, 2014