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Facts about Fahrenheit

Fahrenheit

Fahrenheit is a temperature scale named after Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit (1686–1736), a German physicist who did most of his work in the Netherlands.

Fahrenheit

Fahrenheit is a temperature scale named after Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit (1686–1736), a German physicist who did most of his work in the Netherlands.

Fahrenheit

Fahrenheit is sometimes used by older generations, especially for measurement of higher temperatures.

Fahrenheit

That change was made to easily convert from Celsius to Fahrenheit and vice versa, with a simple formula.

Fahrenheit

The Fahrenheit and Celsius scales intersect at ?40° (i.e., ?40 °F = ?40 °C).

Fahrenheit

Fahrenheit supporters assert its previous popularity was due to Fahrenheit's user-friendliness.

Fahrenheit

According to Oregon Trail Statistics, by William E. Hill, the figures rocketed from 13 in 1840, to 1,475 four years later, nearly doubled the following year, and hit 4,000 in 1847.

Fahrenheit

Fahrenheit noted that his scale placed the freezing point of water at 32 °F and the boiling point at 212 °F, a neat 180 degrees apart.

Fahrenheit

Fahrenheit wanted to avoid the negative temperatures that Ole Rшmer's scale had produced in everyday use.

Fahrenheit

The Fahrenheit scale was the primary temperature standard for climatic, industrial and medical purposes in most English-speaking countries until the 1960s.

Fahrenheit

Some key temperatures relating the Fahrenheit scale to other temperature scales are shown in the table below.

Fahrenheit

On the Fahrenheit scale, the freezing point of water is 32 degrees Fahrenheit (°F) and the boiling point is 212 °F (at standard atmospheric pressure).

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