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Facts about Gallium

Gallium

Gallium does not exist in free form in nature, nor are there any gallium-rich minerals that might serve as primary sources of extraction of the element or its compounds.

Gallium

Gallium (chemical symbol Ga, atomic number 31) is a rare, soft, silvery metal.

Gallium

Some flue dusts from burning coal have been shown to contain as much as 1.5 percent gallium.

Gallium

Most gallium is extracted from the crude aluminum hydroxide solution of the Bayer process for producing alumina and aluminum.

Gallium

Many isotopes of gallium are known, ranging from 56Ga to 86Ga.

Gallium

When liquid gallium solidifies, it expands by 3.1 percent.

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Gallium

Before gallium was discovered, the element and many of its properties had been predicted and described by Dmitri Mendeleev, on the basis of its position in the periodic table.

Gallium

Gallium, its alloys, and its compounds have many applications.

Gallium

Gallium is one of the metals—along with cesium, francium, and mercury)—that is liquid at or near normal room temperature.

Gallium

Gallium is most commonly used in the form of the compound gallium(III) arsenide, which is a semiconductor useful for integrated circuits, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), and laser diodes.

Gallium

In 1875, Lecoq de Boisbaudran discovered gallium by the technique known as spectroscopy.

Gallium

Gallium also diffuses into the crystal lattice of most other metals.

Gallium

Gallium does not crystallize into any of the simple crystal structures.

Gallium

Gallium easily alloys with many other metals, and it was used in small quantities in the core of the first atomic bomb to help stabilize the plutonium crystal structure.

Gallium

When the element is handled with bare hands, the skin acquires a gray stain from an extremely fine dispersion of liquid gallium droplets.

Gallium

High-purity gallium is attacked slowly by mineral acids.

Gallium

Gallium is not considered toxic, but the data about its effects are inconclusive.

Gallium

High-purity, metallic gallium has a brilliant, silvery color.

Gallium

The nitride and phosphide of gallium are also valuable semiconductor materials, and gallium itself is used as a dopant in semiconductors.

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Gallium

Gallium occurs in trace amounts in bauxite (an aluminum ore) and zinc ores.

Gallium

By contrast, like most metals, finely divided gallium loses its luster—powdered gallium appears gray.

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Gallium

Rather, it would have been economic, political, and military issues that truly caused Judah and Israel to go their separate ways, rather than the idolatry of King Solomon.

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