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Facts about Hausa

Hausa

By the twelfth century C.E., the Hausa were becoming one of Africa's major powers.

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Kano was not incorporated into the British Empire until 1903, although the Hausa emir was deposed by the Fulani almost a century earlier.

Hausa

Seven Hausa states, later Emirates of Biram, Daura, Gobir, Kano, Katsina, Rano, and Zaria, really city-states loosely allied together, flourished in the thirteenth century situated between the River Niger and Lake Chad.

Hausa

The traditional homeland of the Hausa was an early location for French and British interests, attracted by the gold deposits and the possibility of using the Niger for transport.

Hausa

The Hausa are a Sahelian people chiefly located in the West African regions of northern Nigeria and southeastern Niger.

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The architecture of the Hausa is perhaps one of the least known but most beautiful architectures of the medieval age.

Hausa

The Hausa people speak the Hausa language which belongs to the Chadic language group, a sub-group of the larger Afro-Asiatic language family, and has a rich literary heritage dating from the fourteenth century.

Hausa

The Hausa remain preeminent in Niger and northern Nigeria.

Hausa

According to legend, King Arthur's round table was made from one huge slice of an ancient oak tree (Schonbeck and Frey 2005).

image: logbaby.com
Hausa

the Hausa utilized a modified Arabic script known as ajami to record their own language; the Hausa compiled several written histories, the most popular being the Kano Chronicles.

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The Hausa are a major presence in Nigerian politics.

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Many Hausa have moved to large coastal cities in West Africa such as Lagos, Accra, or Cotonou, as well as to countries such as Libya, in search of jobs that pay cash wages.

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Hausa farmers time their activities according to seasonal changes in rainfall and temperature.

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The Hausa people have been an important vector for the spread of Islam in West Africa through economic contact, diaspora trading communities, and politics.

Hausa

Seven Hausa kingdoms flourished between the Niger River and Lake Chad, of which the Emirate of Kano was probably the most important.

Hausa

By the early nineteenth century, most of the Hausa emirates were under British control within what was then called the Protectorate of Nigeria.

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The first Emir of Kano, Bagauda, is believed to have been the grandson of Bayajidda, the founder of the Hausa dynasty (who, according to legend, was originally from Baghdad).

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The Muslim tradition of allowing for local practice that does not contradict Islam has resulted in a blend of Hausa law and Islamic Law.

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Closely linked with the Kanuri people of Kanem-Bornu (Lake Chad), the Hausa aristocracy adopted Islam in the eleventh century C.E.

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Their impact in Nigeria is paramount, as the Hausa-Fulani amalgamation has controlled Nigerian politics for much of its independent history.

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Kano is considered the center of Hausa trade and culture.

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Islam has been present in Hausaland since the fourteenth century, but it was largely restricted to the region's rulers and their courts.

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In 1810, the Fulani, another Islamic African ethnic group that spanned across West Africa, invaded the Hausa states.

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The Hausa people are heirs of a civilization that has flourished for over a thousand years in West Africa.

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The Muslim Hausa populations live in peace with the Bori.