A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Facts about Hemophilia

Hemophilia

Tsarevich Alexei Nikolaevich of Russia, son of Nicholas II, was a descendant of Queen Victoria and suffered from hemophilia.

Hemophilia

The unrelated type 1 and type 2 von Willebrand disease (vWD) are milder than any of the three hemophilias; only type 3 von Willebrand disease expresses a severity similar to the hemophilias.

Hemophilia

Some hemophiliacs develop antibodies (inhibitors) against the replacement factors given to them, so the amount of the factor has to be increased or non-human replacement products must be given, such as porcine factor VIII.

Hemophilia

The fact that this corrected the clotting problem showed that there was more than one form of hemophilia.

Hemophilia

factor VIII in Hemophilia A or factor IX in Hemophilia B.

Hemophilia

Hence, hemophilia is far more common among males than females.

Hemophilia

Hemophilia figured prominently in the history of European royalty and thus is sometimes known as "the royal disease."

image: www.ihtc.org
Hemophilia

According to Baxter Healthcare Corporation, a global health care company, in 2006 about 13,500 people in the United States suffer from Hemophilia A.

Hemophilia

The first record of hemophilia is the Jewish holy text, Talmud, which states that males did not have to be circumcised if two brothers had already died from the procedure.

Hemophilia

Hemophilia B affects one out of every 30,000 Americans, which is roughly three thousand people.

Hemophilia

Hemophilia C differs from the other types in many ways.

Hemophilia

Different types of hemophilia also have different genetic tendencies.

Hemophilia

Pavlosky, a doctor from Buenos Aires, found Hemophilia A and Hemophilia B to be separate diseases by doing a lab test.

Hemophilia

Hemophilia, or haemophilia, is the name of any of several hereditary genetic illnesses that impair the body's ability to control bleeding.

Hemophilia

Spontaneous mutations account for about 1/3 of all Hemophilia A and 1/5 of all Hemophilia B cases.

Hemophilia

Genetic testing and genetic counseling are recommended for families with hemophilia.

The bleeding symptoms arise because blood clotting is impaired. ... Hemophilia A is caused by a mutation in the gene for factor VIII, so there is deficiency of this clotting factor. Hemophilia B (also called Christmas disease) results from a deficiency of factor IX due to a mutation in the corresponding gene.

Hemophilia A and hemophilia B are inherited in an X-linked recessive pattern. The genes associated with these conditions are located on the X chromosome, which is one of the two sex chromosomes. In males (who have only one X chromosome), one altered copy of the gene in each cell is sufficient to cause the condition.Feb 13, 2018

Hemophilia has been called a "royal disease". This is because the hemophilia gene was passed from Queen Victoria, who became Queen of England in 1837, to the ruling families of Russia, Spain, and Germany. Queen Victoria's gene for hemophilia was caused by spontaneous mutation.

Hemophilia is diagnosed with blood tests to determine if clotting factors are missing or at low levels, and which ones are causing the problem. If you have a family history of hemophilia, it is important that your doctors know the clotting factor your relatives are missing.

Without adequate treatment, many people with hemophilia die before they reach adulthood. However, with proper treatment, life expectancy for people with hemophilia is about 10 years less than that of males without hemophilia, and children can look forward to a normal life expectancy.

Couples who have conceived naturally may wish to know whether their child is affected by hemophilia before he or she is born. A definitive prenatal diagnosis can only be offered with invasive procedures such as amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling.

People with hemophilia should take the following precautions:Avoid taking aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).Get vaccinated (including infants) with the hepatitis B vaccine.Administer factor VIII or IX (see below) on a regular basis, to help prevent bleeding and joint damage.More items...

Related Facts

Related Question Categories