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Facts about Kremlin

Kremlin

Bazhenov produced a bombastic Neoclassical design on a heroic scale, which involved the demolition of several churches and palaces, as well as a portion of the Kremlin wall.

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After the Bolshevik Revolution, Lenin moved his living quarters into no less than the Kremlin Senate Room, while Stalin later had the towers at his new headquarters covered with shiny Kremlin stars.

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The same tsar also renovated some of his grandfather's palaces, added a new palace and cathedral for his sons, and endowed the Trinity metochion inside the Kremlin.

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The irregular triangle of the Kremlin wall encloses an area of 68 acres.

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During Napoleon's invasion of Russia in 1812, the French forces occupied the Kremlin from September 2 to October 11.

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The Terem Palace and the Palace of Facets are linked by the Grand Kremlin Palace.

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All the while, Russian leaders were making their architectural mark on the Kremlin: Catherine the Great destroyed several churches to create her glorious neo-classical residence and Nicholas I had the famed Winter Palace removed entirely.

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The Cathedral Square is the heart of the Kremlin.

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Existing Kremlin walls and towers were built by Italian masters over the years from 1485 to 1495.

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The Kremlin was home base to power plays involving the early Tatars and later on, the imperial tsars, who set the stage for even more vicious political infighting to come.

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The palace was constructed in 1839 to 1849, followed by the new building of the Kremlin Armory in 1851.

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The Kremlin's liberation by the volunteer army of Kuzma Minin and Dmitry Pozharsky paved the way for the election of Mikhail Romanov as the new tsar.

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The Kremlin would remain the seat and symbol of Soviet power until the fall of the Soviet Union itself in the early 1990s.

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The northwestern section of the Kremlin holds the Armory building.

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The largest structure in the Kremlin, it cost more than one billion dollars to renovate in the 1990s.

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During the Cold War, the Soviet Empire ruled with an iron hand from the Kremlin and the building's name became practically synonymous with Soviet totalitarian power.

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The architect Konstantin Thon was commissioned to replace them with the Grand Kremlin Palace, which was to rival the Winter Palace in St. Petersburg by its dimensions and the opulence of its interiors.

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Stalin also had his personal rooms in the Kremlin.

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When Napoleon fled Moscow, he ordered the whole Kremlin be blown up.

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Lenin selected the Kremlin Senate as his residence—his room is still preserved as a museum.

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After construction of the new Kremlin walls and churches was over in 1516, the monarch decreed that no structures should be built in the immediate vicinity of the citadel.

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Originally there were 18 Kremlin towers, but their number increased to 20 in the seventeenth century.

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The word "kremlin" was first recorded in 1331 and its etymology is disputed.

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The Kremlin Arsenal, several portions of the Kremlin Wall, and several wall towers were destroyed by explosions and fires damaged the Faceted Chamber and churches.

Kremlin

The Moscow Kremlin (Russian: ?????????? ??????), also known as The Kremlin, is a historic fortified complex at the very heart of Moscow, overlooking the Moskva River (to the south), St.

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The northeast corner of the Kremlin is occupied by the Arsenal, which was originally built for Peter the Great in 1701.

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The Moscow Kremlin has remained a paradox since it was initially constructed in the early fourteenth century.

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Following this, there was virtually no new construction in the Kremlin until the Russian Revolution of 1917.

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During the Time of Troubles, the Kremlin was held by the Polish-Lithuanian forces for two years—between September 21, 1610 and October 26, 1612.

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Basil's Cathedral (often mistaken by westerners as the Kremlin) and Red Square (to the east), and the Alexander Garden (to the west).

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Following the death of Alexis, the Kremlin witnessed the Moscow Uprising of 1682, from which Tsar Peter barely escaped alive.

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