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Facts about Kyrgyzstan

Kyrgyzstan

In 1992, Kyrgyzstan joined the United Nations and the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe.

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Kyrgyzstan has significant deposits of metals including gold and rare earth metals.

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Lake Issyk-Kul in the north-western Tian Shan is the largest lake in Kyrgyzstan and the second largest mountain lake in the world after Titicaca.

Kyrgyzstan

The early years of glasnost (a 1985 Soviet Union policy of openness) had little effect on the political climate in Kyrgyzstan.

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Kyrgyzstan

Kyrgyzstan has a high literacy rate of 99 percent.

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Kyrgyzstan has a small upper class and a large lower class.

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Kyrgyzstan has undergone a pronounced change in its ethnic composition since independence.

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Tush kyiz are large, elaborately embroidered wall hangings, traditionally made in Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan by elder women to commemorate the marriage of a son or daughter.

Kyrgyzstan

On December 21, 1991, Kyrgyzstan joined the other four Central Asian Republics to formally enter the new Commonwealth of Independent States.

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During the 1920s, Kyrgyzstan developed considerably in cultural, educational, and social life.

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A small number of Bukharian Jews had lived in Kyrgyzstan, but during the collapse of the Soviet Union most fled to other countries, mainly the United States and Israel.

Kyrgyzstan

Stalin intentionally drew borders inconsistent with the traditional locations of ethnic populations, leaving large numbers of ethnic Uzbeks and Turkmen within Kyrgyzstan's borders.

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Kyrgyzstan

Kyrgyzstan is one of two of the five former Soviet republics in Central Asia to retain Russian as an official language (Kazakhistan is the other).

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The country is rural; only about one-third (33.9 percent) of Kyrgyzstan's population live in urban areas.

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By the early 1990s, the Kyrgyzstan Democratic Movement (KDM) had developed into a significant political force.

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The Mongol invasion of Central Asia in the thirteenth century devastated the territory of Kyrgyzstan, costing its people their independence and their written language.

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Kyrgyzstan is divided into seven provinces or oblast (plural oblasttar) administered by appointed governors.

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Under foreign domination for many centuries (the most recent being the Soviet Union), the beginning of the twenty-first century sees Kyrgyzstan struggling to recover and gain a foothold in the modern world.

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Islam in Kyrgyzstan is more of a cultural background than a devout daily practice for most.

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Kyrgyzstan uses the entire amount to which the agreement entitles it.

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Stone implements found in the Tian Shan mountains indicate the presence of human society in what is now Kyrgyzstan from 200,000 to 300,000 years ago.

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The Chu River also briefly flows through Kyrgyzstan before entering Kazakhstan.

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The army of Kyrgyzstan includes brigades at Osh and Koi-tash, in the Bishkek area, a special forces brigade, and other units.

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On August 19, 1991, when the State Emergency Committee assumed power in Moscow, there was an attempt to depose Akayev in Kyrgyzstan.

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Kyrgyzstan is occasionally referred to as "the Switzerland of Central Asia" as a result.

Kyrgyzstan

Kyrgyzstan (also “Kyrgyz,” “Kirgizia,” or “Kirghizia”), officially the Kyrgyz Republic, is a landlocked and mountainous country in Central Asia.