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Facts about Liger

Liger

The liger is a hybrid cross between a male Panthera leo (lion), and a female Panthera tigris (tiger) and is denoted scientifically as Panthera tigris Ч Panthera leo (Milne 1927).

Liger

The hormonal hypothesis is that the cause of the male liger's growth is its sterility—essentially, the male liger remains in the pre-pubertal growth phase.

Liger

Male ligers also have the same levels of testosterone on average as an adult male lion.

Liger

According to Wild Cats of the World (1975) by C. A. W. Guggisberg, both male and female ligers and tigons were long thought to be sterile.

Liger

Male ligers are sterile, but female ligers are often fertile.

Liger

Ligers share physical and behavioral qualities of both parent species, forming spots and stripes on a sandy background.

Liger

Improper use of ceremonies by non-Hopi can waste this power, leading to Koyaanisqatsi or "World in Chaos" and the destruction of this, the Fourth World.

Liger

According to the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA), accredited zoos frown on the practice of mixing two different species and have never bred ligers.

Liger

White tigers have been crossed with lions to produce "white," actually pale golden, ligers.

Liger

The tiger produces a hormone that sets the fetal liger on a pattern of growth that does not end throughout its life.

Liger

Several AZA zoos are reported to have ligers.

Liger

According to Wild Cats of the World (1975) by C. A. W. Guggisberg, both male and female ligers and tigons were long thought to be sterile.

Liger

The blue or Maltese tiger is now unlikely to exist, making grey or blue ligers an impossibility.

Liger

A liger resembles a giant lion with diffused stripes.

Liger

Ligers have a tiger-like striping pattern on a lion-like tawny background.

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