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Facts about Mammals

Mammals

True flight has evolved only once in mammals, the bats; mammals such as flying squirrels and flying lemurs are actually gliding animals.

Mammals

Live birth also occurs in some non-mammalian species, such as guppies and hammerhead sharks; thus, it is not a distinguishing characteristic of mammals.

Mammals

Monotremes are mammals that lay eggs, and include the platypuses and echidnas (spiny anteaters).

Mammals

Whatever the reason, this terminology ties mammals to a feature that is connected to a key mammalian characteristic: parental behavior.

Mammals

One classification based on molecular studies points to four groups or lineages of placental mammals that diverged from early common ancestors in the Cretaceous.

Mammals

Most mammals give birth to live young, but the monotremes lay eggs.

Mammals

The live-bearing mammals can be divided into two further taxa, the marsupials (sometimes labeled as infraclass Metatheria) and the placentals (infraclass Eutheria).

Mammals

Along with hair, the presence of mammary glands, for feeding milk to their young, is another defining feature of mammals.

Mammals

During the Mesozoic Period, mammals appeared to diversify into four main groups: multituberculates (Allotherium), monotremes, marsupials, and placentals.

Mammals

Like birds, mammals are endothermic or "warm-blooded," and have four-chambered hearts.

Mammals

George Gaylord Simpson's Principles of Classification and a Classification of Mammals (1945) was an original authoritative source for the taxonomy of mammals.

Mammals

Other systems recognize considerably less orders, families, and genera of mammals.

Mammals

The Artiodactyla are even-toed mammals and include pigs, camels, cattle, elk, deer, and the American bison, among others.

Mammals

The Perissodactyla are odd-toed mammals, including rhinoceroses, horses, zebras, and tapirs.

Mammals

Many mammals are indicated as having blue hair or fur, but in all cases it will be found to be a shade of gray.

Mammals

Synapsid therapsids, the assumed ancestors of mammals, became common during the Permian period at the end of the Paleozoic era.

Mammals

Most mammals are terrestrial, but some are aquatic, including sirenia (manatees and dugongs) and the cetaceans.

Mammals

In 1997, the mammals were comprehensively revised by Malcolm McKenna and Susan Bell, which has resulted in the "McKenna/Bell classification."

Mammals

Nonetheless, the terms Eutheria and Metatheria remain in common use in paleontology, especially with regards to mammals of the Mesozoic.

Mammals

During the next eight million years, in the Paleocene period (64–58 million years ago), the fossil record suggests that mammals exploded into the ecological niches left by the extinction of the dinosaurs.

image: c8.alamy.com
Mammals

Mammals also have a diaphragm, a muscle below the rib cage that aids breathing.

Mammals

Placentals generally can be distinguished from other mammals in that the fetus is nourished during gestation via a placenta, although bandicoots (marsupial omnivores) are a conspicuous exception to this rule.

Mammals

Mammals belong among the amniotes (vertebrates that have membranous sacs that surround and protect the embryo) and in particular to a sub-group called the synapsids.

Mammals

Marsupials are generally characterized by the female having a pouch in which it rears its young through early infancy, as well as various reproductive traits that distinguish them from other mammals.

Mammals

Hair and endothermy has aided mammals in inhabiting a wide diversity of environments, from deserts to polar environments, and be active daytime and nighttime.

Mammals

About 5,500 living species of mammals have been identified.

Mammals

Mammals are also the only vertebrates with a single bone in the lower jaw.

Mammals

No mammals have hair that is naturally blue or green in color.

Mammals

Some other vertebrates have a diaphragm, but mammals are the only vertebrates with a prehepatic diaphragm, that is, in front of the liver.

Mammals

Evidence from fossils and comparative anatomy suggest that mammals evolved from therapsid reptiles during the Triassic period (approximately 200-250 million years ago).

Mammals

The presence of hair has helped mammals to maintain a stable core body temperature.

Mammals

Mammals have integumentary systems made up of three layers: the outermost epidermis, the dermis, and the hypodermis.

Giant Anteater. Linne's Two-toed Sloth. Southern Three-banded Armadillo.Andean Bear. Amur Leopard. Amur Tiger. ... Addax. Babirusa. Bactrian Camel. ... Allen's Swamp Monkey. Black and White Colobus Monkey. ... Matschie's Tree Kangaroo. Opossum. ... Black-tailed Prairie Dog. Capybara. ... California Sea Lion. Harbor Seal.Egg-laying Mammals. Hedgehogs.