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Facts about Marble

Marble

Pure white marble is the result of metamorphism of very pure limestone.

Marble

The finest marbles for sculpture have few or no stains.

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Marble

Marble is a metamorphic rock, resulting from the metamorphism (transformation) of sedimentary carbonate rocks—either limestone (composed mainly of the [[mineral calcite) or dolomite rock (composed mainly of the mineral dolomite).

Marble

Among the commonly available stones, only marble has a slight surface translucency that is comparable to that of the human skin.

Marble

Compared to metals such as bronze, marble lacks ductility and strength, requiring special structural considerations when planning a sculpture.

Marble

Limestone is cheaper but less translucent than marble.

Marble

The extremely varied and colorful patterns of marble make it a favorite decorative material.

Marble

White marbles, like Carrara, have been prized for sculpture since classical times.

Marble

Marble patterns are also evident in backgrounds for computer displays.

Marble

Marble is a metamorphic rock, composed mainly of crystalline calcium carbonate or calcium magnesium carbonate.

Marble

Finely ground marble powder is a component in paints, toothpaste, and plastics.

Marble

The temperatures and pressures necessary to form marble usually destroy any fossils and sedimentary textures present in the original rock.

Marble

Places named after the stone include Marble Hill in Manhattan, New York; the Sea of Marmara; India's Marble Rocks; the towns of Marble in Minnesota and Colorado; and Marble Arch in London.

Marble

The Elgin Marbles are marble sculptures from the Parthenon (ancient Greek temple) that are on display in the British Museum.

Marble

Colorless marbles are a very pure source of calcium carbonate, which is used in a wide range of industries.

Marble

Marble also has the advantage that when first quarried it is relatively soft and easy to work, refine, and polish.

Marble

Powdered marble is used as an ingredient in paints, toothpaste, and plastics, or it may be added to cement or synthetic resins to produce "cultured marble."

Marble

The word "marble" derives from the Greek marmaros, meaning "shining stone."

Marble

Marble does not bear handling well, as it will absorb skin oils when touched, producing stains ranging from yellow to brown.

Marble

Marble sculpture is the art of creating three-dimensional forms from marble.

Marble

Pure white marble is a symbol of purity and immortality.

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