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Facts about Nero

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The Senate deposed Nero, and declared him an enemy of the state.

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Returning to Rome after the following year, Nero found quite a cold atmosphere; Gaius Julius Vindex, the governor of Gallia Lugdunensis, revolted, and this brought Nero to a paranoid hunt for eventual threats.

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Nero was older than his adoptive brother Britannicus and effectively became heir to the throne at the time of his adoption.

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Nero turned to those with him and joked, "I'll take it off at once."

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Nero (at the time called Lucius) came to the attention of his uncle soon after his birth.

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Otho early introduced Nero to one particular woman who would marry first the favorite (Otho) and then the emperor: Poppaea Sabina, described as a woman of great beauty, charm, and wit.

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Nero’s scapegoats were the perfect choice because it temporarily relieved pressure of the various rumors going around Rome.

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Hated by many citizens, with an increasing list of political enemies, Nero started to appreciate his loneliness, when in 65 C.E.

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On February 25, 50, Lucius was officially adopted by Claudius as Nero Claudius Caesar Drusus.

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Nero, like Caligula, obtained power by the privilege of his birth.

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Britannicus was a likely heir to Nero and ensuring her influence over him could strengthen her position.

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Galen believed that this idea originated with Hippocrates, though it is possible that it predated him.

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The first five years under Nero became known as examples of fine administration, even resulting in the coinage of the term "Quinquennium Neronis."

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Fifteen-year-old Britannicus was still legally a minor under the charge of Nero but was approaching legal adulthood.

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Nero was 17 years old when he became emperor, the youngest Rome had seen.

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The next turning points in Nero's life took place in the year 62 C.E.

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Nero disregarded many of decrees and acts as the work of a madman and a dotard.

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By all accounts Otho was as dissolute as Nero but served as a good and intimate friend to him.

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A Jewish legend contained in the Talmud (tractate Gittin 56B) claims that Nero shot four arrows to the four corners of the earth, and they fell in Jerusalem.

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Nymphidius corrupted the imperial guard, which turned against Nero on the promise of financial reward by Galba.

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Nero later said that he was haunted by his mother's ghost in the wisp of torch lights.

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A literal translation would be "this is fidelity," but "what faithfulness" is probably closer to what Nero meant.

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Nero, however, loved to perform before a crowd and craved the attention and applause.

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Popular legend remembers Nero as a pleasure seeker who engaged in petty amusements while neglecting the problems of the Roman city and empire and as the emperor who metaphorically "fiddled while Rome burned."

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Portions of his biography of Nero appear openly hostile, and while it might be possible that Nero's rule invited such hostility, some modern historians question the accuracy of his account.

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Soon after, Nero murdered his aunt Domitia Lepida Major.

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Nero's participation went along with huge sums of bribery; the Greeks postponed the games upon Nero's wish and furthermore introduced the chariot race.

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Nero had to find a scapegoat of his own, and chose for his target a small Eastern sect called the Christians.

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In ancient Greek, the language of the New Testament, Nero was referred to as Neron Caesar, which has the numerical value of 666.

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Sibylline Oracles, Book 3, allegedly written before Nero's time, prophesies antichrist and identifies him with Nero.

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The last sentence may be a rhetorical construct of the author designed to further damn Nero, rather than reportage of actual Roman sympathy for the Christians, which seems unlikely to many historians.

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Nero considered himself a great artist and performer, and did not hesitate to show off his "gifts."

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The fault of Nero in this rebellion is debatable but there was certainly an impact (both positive and negative) upon the prestige of his regime.

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A magnificent villa in Olympia was erected for Nero's stay (and can be visited at the archaeological site).

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Ambitious, Tigellinus managed to become a favorite of Nero (and, reputedly, his lover).

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Nero and/or Poppaea reportedly machinated the murder of Agrippina.

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Nero's great-grandparents were Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus and Aemilia Lepida and their son, Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus, was Nero's paternal grandfather.

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Ancient sources and scholars favor Nero as the arsonist, but massive accidentally started fires were common in ancient Rome and this was probably no exception.

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Nero proceeded to declare the divorce on grounds of infertility, leaving him free to marry Poppaea and wait for her to give birth.

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In 66 C.E., though Nero doted on Poppaea, he reportedly kicked her to death while she was pregnant and ill, because she complained that he came home late from the races.

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Nero resisted the intervention of his mother in his personal affairs.

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Nero was reportedly unsatisfied with his marriage and tended to neglect Octavia.

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Gossip of Nero, Otho, and Poppaea each forming parts of a love triangle can be found in numerous sources (Plutarch Galba 19.2–20.2; Suetonius Otho; Tacitus two versions: Histories ; Annals ; and Dio Cassius.

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The first was a change of guard amongst Nero's advisers.

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Nero fled, and committed suicide on June 9, 68 C.E.

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When Poppaea became pregnant, Nero finally decided to marry his mistress, but his marriage to Octavia had to be dissolved before doing so.

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By 58 C.E., Poppaea had become established in her position as Nero's favorite mistress.

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Over the years, this rumor became the legend that Nero had fiddled as Rome burned, an impossible act as the fiddle had not yet been invented.

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Other sources, however, state that Nero uttered his last words as he lay bleeding to death on the floor.

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Born in Antium, near Rome, on December 15, 37 C.E., Nero was the only son of Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus and Agrippina the Younger, sister and reputed lover of Caligula.

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One of these later writers is Commodianus, whose Institutes 1.41 states that the future antichrist will be Nero returned from hell.

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Rumors circulated that Nero had played his lyre and sang, on top of Quirinal Hill, while the city burned.

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Born into great wealth and luxury with little training in administration, a life of indolence was probable for Nero.

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much of the population blamed Nero for failing to control the fire.

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Burrus and Seneca, however, chose to support their Nero's decision.

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At the time, the confused population searched for a scapegoat and soon rumors held Nero responsible.

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When Nero was born, he was not expected to become Augustus (a title that is honorific of the first citizen).

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Burrus died and Seneca asked Nero for permission to retire from public affairs.

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Historians generally consider Nero to have acted as a figurehead early in his reign.

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Nero thus realized that the Lord would punish him for destroying his Temple, so he fled Rome and converted to Judaism, to avoid such retribution.

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Nero Claudius Caesar Augustus Germanicus (December 15, 37 C.E.

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Nero was proclaimed an adult in 51 C.E.