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Facts about New Orleans

Another nickname is the Birthplace of Jazz because that kind of music started in New Orleans. It is also called Mardi Gras City for the wild celebrations and parades that take place there every year. And, there is a nickname that uses the short way to write New Orleans and Louisiana.Mar 13, 2010

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New Orleans is called the Crescent City because the original town-the Vieux Carré, also called the French Quarter-was built at a sharp bend in the Mississippi River. The town was founded about 1718 by Jean Baptiste Le Moyne, Sieur de Bienville.

Louisiana Voodoo, also known as New Orleans Voodoo, describes a set of spiritual folkways developed from the traditions of the African diaspora. It is a cultural form of the Afro-American religions developed by West and Central Africans populations of the U.S. state of Louisiana.

Founded by the French, ruled for 40 years by the Spanish and bought by the United States in the 1803 Louisiana Purchase, New Orleans is known for its distinct Creole culture and vibrant history. Significant battles of the War of 1812 and the Civil War were fought over the city.

New Orleans is famous for its cuisine, music (particularly as the birthplace of jazz) and its annual celebrations and festivals, most notably Mardi Gras. The city is often referred to as the "most unique" in the United States.

Already a melting pot of various immigrant cultures – French, Spanish, German, African and Irish, to name a few – Louisiana Creole French was only one of many languages spoken in early New Orleans. French was especially prominent in early New Orleans, due to its longstanding presence in the region.Jun 3, 2011

The effect of Hurricane Katrina on New Orleans was catastrophic and long-lasting. The storm, which was the costliest hurricane as well as one of the deadliest natural disasters in U.S. history, made it's second and third landfalls in the Gulf Coast region on August 29, 2005 as a Category 3 hurricane.

Early in the morning on August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast of the United States. When the storm made landfall, it had a Category 3 rating on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale–it brought sustained winds of 100–140 miles per hour–and stretched some 400 miles across.