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Facts about New Zealand

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Full independence was granted with the Statute of Westminster in 1931, which was adopted by the New Zealand parliament in 1947.

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The number of overseas students receiving education in New Zealand expanded dramatically and the importance of "export education" to the national economy rivaled that of other more established industries.

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New Zealand is a party to the ANZUS security treaty between Australia, New Zealand, and the U.S.

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After financial reforms in 1984, successive governments transformed New Zealand from a highly protectionist and regulated economy to a liberalized free market economy.

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New Zealand's total land area, nearly 270,000 kmІ, is about the same as that of Colorado and somewhat smaller than the Philippines.

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A deal is expected to eventually increase New Zealand exports by 40 percent.

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About 70 percent of New Zealand's population is of European descent, mostly English, Scottish, Welsh, Irish, and Dutch.

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The Moriori people of the Chatham Islands, located to the east of the main islands, multiplied from a group of New Zealand Polynesians who traveled there by canoe in the fourteenth or fifteenth century.

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New Zealand is an island country located in the southwestern Pacific Ocean.

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The relative proximity of New Zealand to Antarctica has made South Island a gateway of sorts for scientific expeditions and tourist excursions to the icebound continent.

image: dommy.com
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New Zealand became an independent dominion in 1907.

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The first Europeans to live in New Zealand were seamen who jumped ship, convicts who had escaped from British penal colonies in Australia, sealers, whalers, and traders.

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English and Maori are the two official languages, although most visitors would find New Zealand exclusively an English-speaking country.

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New Zealand is to host the 2011 Rugby Union World Cup.

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New Zealand dismantled its air combat capability in 2001.

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New Zealand is dependent on trade—particularly in agricultural products—and has been affected by global economic slowdowns and slumps in commodity prices.

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New Zealand hosted the last two competitions for international yacht racing's top prize, the America's Cup (2000 and 2003), by virtue of being the home of the winning team in 1995 and 2000.

image: www.slh.com
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In 2004, it began discussing free trade with China, which is New Zealand's fourth-largest trading partner.

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Cook mapped the main islands and the east coast of Australia, and named the country New Zealand.

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New Zealanders, known internationally as “Kiwis,” are distinctive for their twangy dialect of English and propensity to travel long distances, and are quickly associated with the All Blacks rugby team and the haka.

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An economic bubble developed in the New Zealand stock market starting in 1984.

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New Zealand recorded the highest casualties per head of population of any combatant nation during World War I, when 100,000 served and 17,000 were killed.

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New Zealand's landscape has appeared in television series such as Xena: Warrior Princess.

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New Zealand once had about 20 times more sheep than people; by 2001 there were only 12 times as many.

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New Zealand aligned itself with the allied nations in World War I, World War II, and the Korean War.

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New Zealand was initially administered as a part of the colony of New South Wales.

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Christianity is the predominant religion in New Zealand, although nearly 40 percent of the population has no religious affiliation.

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The country has the distinction of being the only one outside the U.S. to hold multiple America's Cup races, but lost the cup in 2003 to a Swiss team (with a New Zealander skipper).

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New Zealand dismantled its air combat capability in 2001.

The history of New Zealand dates back at least 700 years to when it was discovered and settled by Polynesians, who developed a distinct Māori culture centred on kinship links and land. The first European explorer to sight New Zealand was Dutch navigator Abel Tasman on 13 December 1642.

A small island nation home to around 4.5 million people located in the Pacific Ocean, New Zealand is famous for its national rugby team, its indigenous Maori culture and its picturesque landscape.Apr 23, 2015

Maori Language Terms. New Zealand is a bilingual country and Te Reo is our other national language. It's not as widely spoken as English but you might hear some of these words come up in conversation... Kia Ora (key-or-a) – hello, goodbye, thank you.

Succulent and tender, roast lamb is a Kiwi favourite. New Zealand lamb is held in high esteem throughout the world and is one of the country's top export meats. Best enjoyed flavoured with rosemary and plenty of seasonal veggies, roast lamb is a meal that is sure to impress.

For dishes that have a distinctly New Zealand style, there's lamb, pork and cervena (venison), salmon, crayfish (lobster), Bluff oysters, whitebait, paua (abalone), mussels, scallops, pipis and tuatua (both are types of New Zealand shellfish), kumara (sweet potato), kiwifruit, tamarillo and pavlova, the national ...

Spaghetti on toast. ... Kiwifruit. ... Lamb. ... Hokey Pokey ice cream. ... Manuka Honey. ... Anzac biscuits. ... L&P. L&P is a drink that originated in the small New Zealand town of Paeroa. ... Pavlova. Pavlova is a New Zealand dessert best described as a big meringue cake topped with fresh fruit and cream.More items...

Here are our favourite New Zealand produced drinks and general drinks that New Zealand does well.L&P. You thought this was going to be all alcoholic beverages didn't you? ... Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc Wine. ... Apple Cider. ... Craft Beer. ... Coffee. ... Mulled Cider. ... water. ... Speight's Beer.More items...

Sport in New Zealand largely reflects its British colonial heritage, with some of the most popular sports being rugby union, rugby league, cricket, football (soccer) basketball and netball which are primarily played in Commonwealth countries.

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