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Facts about Ocelot

Ocelot

The ocelot is mostly nocturnal and very territorial.

Ocelot

Studies suggest that it follows and finds terrestrial prey via odor trails, but the ocelot also has very keen vision, including night vision.

Ocelot

The ocelot's appearance is similar to that of the domestic cat.

Ocelot

The ocelot, placed in species Leopardus pardalis, is part of the Felinae subfamily.

Ocelot

The ocelot is well equipped for an arboreal lifestyle, being an excellent climber, and it will sometimes take to the trees; however, it is mostly terrestrial.

Ocelot

The ocelot is part of the Felidae family, which belongs to the Carnivora order within the mammals (Class Mammalia).

Ocelot

The ocelot once inhabited the chaparral thickets of the Gulf coast in south and eastern Texas, and was found in Arizona.

Ocelot

Ocelots range in weight roughly between 8.5 and 16 kilograms (18 to 35 pounds) (Grzimek et al.

Ocelot

The ocelot has a geographic range from northern Argentina to southwestern Texas (Langenburg and Mulheisen 2003; Grzimek et al.

Ocelot

Ocelots are an integral component of ecosystems, limiting the population size of rodents, rabbits, monkeys, and other prey.

Ocelot

Forest dwelling ocelots tend to have a more yellow or orange-yellow coat, while those living in arid scrub tend to be grayer (Grzimek et al.

Ocelot

Ocelots also have been valued for their fur.

Ocelot

On the back of each ear, ocelots have a single white spot, and some white markings around the eyes and mouth (Langenburg and Mulheisen 2003).

Ocelot

The ocelot is the largest of the generally dainty Leopardus wild cat genus.

Ocelot

The ocelot was formerly listed as Felis pardalis and was first described by Linnaeus in 1758.

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Ocelot

The ocelot's continued presence in the United States is questionable, due largely to the introduction of dogs, the loss of habitat, and the introduction of highways.

Ocelot

The name ocelot comes from the Nahuatl word ?c?l?tl (pronounced ), which usually refers to jaguars (Panthera onca) rather than ocelots (Pickett 2000; Karttunen 1983; Lockhart 2001).

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Ocelot

Ocelots live in a variety of different habitats, including tropical forest, marshes, savanna (grassland ecosystem with scattered trees or shrubs), mangroves, dense thorn shrub, and mountainous regions (Langenburg and Mulheisen 2003; Grzimek et al.

Ocelot

Young male Ocelots while searching for territory are frequently killed by cars.

Ocelot

The Texas ocelot subspecies, Leopardus pardalis albescens, is still classified as endangered as of the IUCN's 2006 red list.

Ocelot

On the back of each ear, ocelots have a single white spot, and some white markings around the eyes and mouth (Langenburg and Mulheisen 2003).