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Facts about Pineapple

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MD-2 is a hybrid that originated in the breeding program of the now-defunct Pineapple Research Institute in Hawaii, which conducted research on behalf of Del Monte, Maui Land and Pineapple, and Dole.

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At one time, most fresh pineapples also were produced on Smooth Cayenne plants.

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The Pineapple Research Institute dissolved in 1986 and its assets were divided between Del Monte and Maui Land and Pineapple.

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Some believe that dipping pineapple slices in a mild salt water solution will mitigate this effect and may also intensify the pineapple flavor.

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Fresh pineapple is often somewhat expensive as the tropical fruit is delicate and difficult to ship.

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The pineapple is an old symbol of hospitality and can often be seen in carved wood decorations and stone sculptures (untufted pineapples are sometimes mistaken for pine cones).

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Pineapple contains a proteolytic enzyme bromelain, which digests food by breaking down protein (Bender and Bender 2005).

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Some have claimed that pineapple has benefits for some intestinal disorders, while others claim that it helps to induce childbirth when a baby is overdue (Adaikan and Adebiyi 2004).

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The primary exporters of fresh pineapples in 2001 were Costa Rica, 322,000 tons; Cфte d'Ivoire, 188,000 tons; and the Philippines, 135,000 tons.

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Pineapple can also be used to enhance digestion.

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The Fujita scale and the Enhanced Fujita Scale rate tornadoes by damage caused.

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The enzymes in pineapples can interfere with the preparation of some foods, such as gelatin-based desserts.

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Pineapple is traditionally used in the Philippines as an antihelminthic agent to expel parasitic worms (helminths) from the body] (Monzon 1995).

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Pineapples are the only bromeliad fruit in widespread cultivation.

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Pineapples can ripen after harvest, but require certain temperatures for this process to occur.

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Pineapple is the common name for low-growing, fruit-bearing, tropical plants of the species Ananas comosus (also known as A. sativus) in the bromeliad family (Bromeliaceae).

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The pineapple is endemic to Central and South America and symbolic representations have been found in pre-Inca ruins (Herbst 2001).

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Pineapples, like bananas, are chill-sensitive and should not be stored in the refrigerator.

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Pineapple juice can thus be used as a marinade and tenderizer for meat.

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The name pineapple in English (or piсa in Spanish) comes from the similarity of the fruit to a pine cone.

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When European explorers discovered this tropical fruit, they called them "pineapples" (with the term first recorded in that sense in 1664) because it resembled what we know as pine cones.

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The term "planarian" is most often used as a common name for any member of Tricladida, while "planaria" is the name of one genus within the family Planariidae.

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The ripening of pineapples can be rather difficult as they will not ripen for some time and in a day or two become over-ripe; therefore, pineapples are most widely available canned.

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In 1997, Del Monte began marketing its Gold Extra Sweet pineapple, known internally as MD-2.

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Certain bat-pollinated wild pineapples do the exact opposite of most flowers by opening their flowers at night and closing them during the day; this protects them from weevils, which are most active during daylight hours.

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Fresh pineapple cannot be used to make jelly, as the bromelain in the fruit prevents gelatin from setting.

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The natural (or most common) pollinator of the pineapple is the hummingbird.

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The pineapple was so coveted and uncommon that in the 1600s King Charles II of England posed receiving a pineapple as a gift in an official portrait.

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Fresh pineapple may cause irritation of the tip of the tongue in some cases.

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Victoria', a cultivar of small, sugary and flavourful pineapples, is particularly popular on Rйunion Island.

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The pineapple spread from its original area through cultivation, and by the time of Christopher Columbus it grew throughout South and Central America, southern Mexico, and the Caribbean (West Indies).

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According to Levit and Boissy (2001), the nail plate is composed of "closely packed, fully keratinized, multilayered lamellae of cornified cells" (Levit and Boissy 2001).

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Other members of the Ananas genus are often called pineapple as well by laymen.

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Pineapples sold on the market typically average between two to five pounds in weight, but pineapples can grow to a weight of 20 pounds (Herbst 2001).

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Pineapples and other tropical fruit, in a Peruvian market.

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Pineapple is commonly used in desserts and other types of fruit dishes, or served on its own.

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The word "pineapple," first recorded in 1398, was originally used to describe the reproductive organs of conifer trees (now termed pine cones).

Can you eat pineapple while pregnant? Pineapple is a safe, healthy choice during pregnancy. Someone might have told you to avoid this fruit because it may cause early miscarriage, or bring on labor. But this is an old wives' tale.Apr 12, 2016

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