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Facts about Prague

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The always lively intellectual world of Prague, however, suffered under the totalitarian regime, in spite of the rather careful program of rebuilding and caring for the damaged monuments after World War II.

Prague

The Czech Lands were among the most powerful in Europe, and the modern city of Prague looks the way it does due to the influence of Charles IV.

Prague

Prague's public transit infrastructure consists of an integrated transit system of Prague Metro with its three metro lines and 54 stations, trams, (including the nostalgic tram no.

Prague

Replete with significant cultural institutions, Prague hosts many cultural and musical events.

Prague

In 1355 Charles IV was crowned the emperor of the Holy Roman Empire in Rome, and Prague became the capital of the Holy Roman Empire.

Prague

In 1597, he attempted a second invasion with an army of 140,000, but following Hideyoshi's death, Japanese troops were withdrawn in 1598.

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Most of the Jews living in Prague emigrated after the war, particularly after the communist coup, the establishment of Israel in 1948, and the Soviet invasion in 1968.

Prague

In 1993, after the split of Czechoslovakia into the Czech Republic and Slovakia, Prague became the capital city of the new Czech Republic.

Prague

Prague (Czech: Praha), is the capital and largest city of the Czech Republic.

Prague

Prague is served by Ruzyn? International Airport, one of Europe's most modern airports, which is the hub of the flag carrier, Czech Airlines (CSA).

image: c8.alamy.com
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The land where Prague was to be built has been settled since the Paleolithic Age.

Prague

By the early tenth century, the area around and below Prague Castle had developed into an important trading center, where merchants coming from all over Europe gathered.

Prague

After the Peace of Westphalia ended the Thirty Years' War, Ferdinand II moved the court to Vienna, and Prague embarked on a steady decline that reduced the population three-fold to 20,000.

Prague

According to Guinness World Records, Prague Castle is the largest ancient castle in the world.

Prague

In 1989, after the Berlin Wall had fallen, the Velvet Revolution crowded the streets of Prague, and Czechoslovakia finally freed itself from communism and Soviet influence.

Prague

Bo?ivoj moved his seat to Prague, also called the Prague castle grounds or Prague Castle, which thus became the seat of the Czech rulers as well as the world's largest castle and inhabited fortress.

Prague

Prague has two international railway stations, Hlavnн nбdraћн (sometimes referred to as Wilsonovo nбdraћн, named for former United States president Woodrow Wilson) and Praha Holeљovice, and a number of smaller suburban stations.

image: blog.rail.cc
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The seventeenth century saw an increase of state control over the church in all the Catholic countries, and in the eighteenth century the Bourbons began a course openly aimed at eliminating the papacy.

image: img.radio.cz
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Prague’s cubists even set up a housing establishment inspired by this style.

image: i.pinimg.com
Prague

The settlement had the dual goals of establishing trade with the Spanish in Texas and deterring Spanish advances into Louisiana.

Prague

Prague suffered considerably less damage during World War II than other major cities in the region, allowing most of its historic architecture to stay true to form.

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Some of these are: Orloj (The Astronomical Clock), Karl?v Most (Charles Bridge), Prague Castle with its Katedrбla Sv.

Prague

During his reign, the social and religious reformer Master Jan Hus, a preacher and rector of Charles University, held sermons in Prague’s Bethlehem Chapel, speaking in Czech, advocating reformation of the Roman Catholic Church.

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On May 9, 1945, the day after Germany officially capitulated, the Soviet tanks reached Prague, and it was not until May 12, 1945, that the war was quelled in the Czech Lands.

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A castle named Prague will be built there, on the seven hills of which a fair city will grow, whose fame will rise to the stars.

Prague

Thanks to legumes' nitrogen-fixing capabilities they can be grown without supplemental fertilizer as is needed by most other kinds of agricultural crops.

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That same day, General Patton's 150,000-strong American Third Army was in Pilsen, only a few hours away from Prague, while Marshal Konev's Soviet Army was on the borders of Moravia.

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The four independent boroughs that had formerly constituted Prague—Hrad?any, Malб Strana, Starй M?sto and Novй M?sto—were proclaimed a single city in 1784.

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Only a brief excursion into the succession of its rulers and the famous, with their respective imprints on architecture, arts, and learning can one fully appreciate and understand Prague.

Prague

The expulsion of Jews from Prague by Queen Maria Theresa of Austria in 1745, allegedly due to their collaboration with the Prussian army, was a severe blow to the flourishing community.

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In 973, the first bishopric was founded in Bohemia, with the bishop's palace located on the Prague Castle grounds.

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In 965, Jewish merchant and traveler Ibrahim ibn Ya'qub wrote: "Prague is built from stone and lime, and it has the biggest trade center.

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The town of Hrad?any, which was built just outside of Prague's castle grounds, dates back to 1320.

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During the war, the citizens of Prague were widely oppressed and persecuted by the Nazis.

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Prague became the capital—truly European with the highly developed industrial base, and until the outbreak of World War II, a sanctuary for the Europeans exiled by totalitarian and fascist regimes.

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m. Prahy (The Capital City of Prague Transit Company).

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Another famous astronomer working out of Prague was Johannes Kepler.

Prague

Prague (Czech: Praha), is the capital and largest city of the Czech Republic.

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After the great fire of 1689 devastated Prague, the city was renovated and rebuilt.

image: galenf.com
Prague

Rudolf II of the Hapsburg Dynasty (1583-1612) left an indelible impression on Prague thanks to his love of the arts.

Prague

Prague became the capital—truly European with the highly developed industrial base, and until the outbreak of World War II, a sanctuary for the Europeans exiled by totalitarian and fascist regimes.

Prague

Across the river Vltava, the Old Town of Prague (Starй M?sto) had already gained the privilege of a town in 1230.