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Facts about Sahel

Sahel

the climate of the Sahara and the Sahel started to become drier at an exceedingly fast pace.

Sahel

The Sahel region is one of primarily agriculture and pastoralism, which is negatively affected by periodic droughts and resultant famines.

Sahel

Traditionally, most of the people in the Sahel have been semi-nomads, farming and raising livestock in a system of transhumance, which is probably the most sustainable way of utilizing the Sahel.

Sahel

On its passage over the desert it picks up fine dust particles (between 0.5 and 10 micrometers), delivering them to the Sahel.

Sahel

The seasonal wetlands of the Sahel are important for migratory birds moving within Africa and on the African-Eurasian flyways.

Sahel

The people of the Sahel have been both victims and abusers of the environment.

Sahel

The Conference was organized in response to the food crises of the early 1970s brought on by the Sahelian drought.

image: www.wfp.org
Sahel

The first large Sahelian kingdoms emerged after 750, and supported several large trading cities in the Niger Bend region, including Timbuktu, Gao, and DjennŠ¹.

Sahel

The Sahelian kingdoms were a series of empires, based in the Sahel, which had many similarities.

Sahel

The Sahel is mostly covered in grassland and savanna, with areas of woodland and shrubland.

Sahel

Several isolated plateaus and mountain ranges rise from the Sahel, but are designated as separate ecoregions because their flora and fauna are distinct from the surrounding lowlands.

Sahel

Collectively these states are known as the Sahelian kingdoms.

Sahel

In 1973, The United Nations Sahelian Office (UNSO) was created to address the severe effects of recurrent droughts in the Sahel.

Sahel

The topography of the Sahel is mainly flat, and the region mostly lies between 200 and 400 meters (656-1313 ft) elevation.

Sahel

The first instances of domestication of plants for agricultural purposes in Africa occurred in the Sahel region circa 5000 B.C.E., when sorghum and African Rice began to be cultivated.