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Facts about Salmonella

Salmonella

Alcohol has proven to be an effective topical sanitizer against salmonella.

Salmonella

Salmonella are found in the intestinal tract of humans, and many animals, including domestic animals, such as chicken and cattle.

Salmonella

Salmonella was named after Daniel Elmer Salmon (1850-1914), an American veterinary pathologist, who described Salmonella enterica (formerly S. choleraesuis).

Salmonella

Salmonella species are motile and produce hydrogen sulfide (Giannella et al.

Salmonella

Salmonellosis is the name of a group of infectious diseases caused by salmonella, including typhoid fever, paratyphoid fever, and food poisoning.

Salmonella

Other salmonellae are frequent causes of foodborne illness, especially from poultry and raw eggs and more generally from food that has been cooked or frozen, and not eaten straight away.

Salmonella

Salmonella do not require oxygen and their main habitat is the intestinal tract of animals.

Salmonella

Salmonella isolates are most commonly classified according to serology (Kauffman-White classification) (JCICSP 2005).

Salmonella

Salmonella (plural salmonellae, salmonellas, or salmonella) are any of the various rod-shaped, gram-negative bacteria that comprise the genus Salmonella (family Enterobacteriaceae), some of which are pathogenic.

Salmonella

Nonflammable Alcohol Vapor in carbon dioxide NAV-CO2 systems or sodium hypochlorite are frequently used to sanitize surfaces to prevent salmonella.

Salmonella

Salmonella is a well-known genus because of its ability to cause disease.

Salmonella

The full golf swing is an unnatural, highly complex motion and notoriously difficult to learn.

Salmonella

Salmonellae may then be recovered by inoculating the enrichment broth on one or more of the primary selective media.

Salmonella

Like other members of the bacterial family Enterobacteriaceae, species of Salmonella are gram-negative and rod-shaped.

Salmonella

Disease-causing Salmonella species have recently been re-classified into a single species, Salmonella enterica, which has numerous serovars.

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