A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Facts about Sediment

Sediment

Lake-bed sediments that have not solidified into rock can be used to determine past climatic conditions.

Sediment

The following are major areas for deposition of sediments in the marine environment.

Sediment

The term society emerged in the fifteenth century and is derived from the French sociйtй.

Sediment

The resulting sediment load in rivers is ongoing, with most rivers a dark red brown color.

Sediment

Sediment is any particulate matter that is transported by the flow of fluids (such as water and air) and eventually deposited in a layer of solid particles.

image: www.mdpi.com
Sediment

When a fluid (such as water) carries particles in suspension, the process by which the particulates settle to the bottom and form a sediment is called settling.

Sediment

Seas, oceans, and lakes also accumulate sediment over time.

Sediment

The process of deposition by settling of a suspended material is called sedimentation.

Sediment

Glacial moraine (rock debris) deposits and till (unsorted sediment) are ice-transported sediments.

Sediment

Surface runoff water can pick up soil particles and transport them in overland flow for deposition at a lower land elevation or deliver that sediment to receiving waters.

image: all-geo.org
Sediment

Sediments may be transported by the action of streams, rivers, glaciers, and wind.

Sediment

The process of sedimentation helps renew nutrients in the soil, thereby supporting living organisms.

Sediment

One of the main causes of riverine sediment load siltation stems from "slash and burn" treatment of tropical forests.

Sediment

The bedforms are often preserved in sedimentary rocks and can be used to estimate the direction and magnitude of the depositing flow.

Sediment

Saltation marks are often preserved in solid rocks and can be used to estimate the flow rate of the rivers that originally deposited the sediments.

Related Types

Related Question Categories