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Facts about Snow

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Many rivers originating in mountainous or high-latitude regions have a significant portion of their flow from snowmelt.

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A longwave heat exchange takes place between the snowpack and its surrounding environment that includes overlaying air mass, tree cover, and clouds.

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Snowflakes can come in many different forms, including columns, needles, and plates (with and without "dendrites"—the "arms" of some snowflakes).

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Rain on snow could induce significant heat input to the snowpack.

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Cloud temperatures and physical processes in the cloud affect the shape of individual snow crystals.

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The water equivalent of the snow is thickness of the layer of water having the same content.

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The exact reason for the threefold symmetry of triangular snowflakes is still a mystery although trigonal symmetry is a subsymmetry of hexagonal.

image: i.imgur.com
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Guinness World Records lists the world’s largest snowflakes as having fallen in January 1887, at Fort Keogh, Montana—it is said that one of them was 15 inches (38 cm) wide.

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Snow serves as a thermal insulator conserving the heat of the Earth and protecting crops from subfreezing weather.

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On the other hand, substantial snowfall can disrupt infrastructure and services.

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Large, well formed snowflakes are relatively flat and have six roughly identical arms, so that the snowflake nearly has the same 6-fold dihedral symmetry as a hexagon or hexagram.

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Rarely, at a temperature of around -2 °C (28 °F), snowflakes can form in threefold symmetry—triangular snowflakes.

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Snow that falls in maritime climates is usually denser than snow that falls in mid-continent locations because of the higher average temperatures over oceans than over land masses.

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Snow is a type of precipitation in the form of crystalline water ice, consisting of a multitude of snowflakes that fall from clouds.

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The energy balance of the snowpack is dictated by several heat exchange processes.

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The highest seasonal total snowfall ever measured was at Mount Baker Ski Area, outside of Bellingham, Washington, in the United States, during the 1998–1999 season.

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Snow can act as an insulator that conserves the heat of the Earth, protecting crops from sub-freezing weather.

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Between temperatures of -1 °C (30 °F) and -3 °C (27 °F), the snowflake will be in the form of a dendrite or a plate or the six petaled ice flower.

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Each snowflake is an aggregate of ice crystals that forms while falling through and beneath a cloud.

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A generally insignificant conductive heat exchange takes place between the snowpack and the underlying ground.

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The American Meteorological Society has reported that matching snow crystals were discovered by Nancy Knight of the National Center for Atmospheric Research.

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At temperatures approaching -20 °C, sectored plates are formed which appears as a dendrite, with each dendrite appearing flattened, like the design of a snowflake plate.

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Once the snow is on the ground, it settles under its own weight (largely due to differential evaporation), until its density is approximately 30 percent of water.

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The most common snowflakes are visibly irregular, although near-perfect snowflakes may be more common in pictures because they are more visually appealing.

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A mudslide, flash flood, or avalanche can occur when excessive snow has accumulated on a mountain and there is a sudden change of temperature.

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The sixfold symmetry happens because of the basic hexagonal crystalline structure from which the snowflake grows.

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Highly branched or dendritic crystals tend to have more space between the arms of ice that form the snow flake and this snow will therefore have a lower density, often referred to as "dry" snow.

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Mount Baker received 1,140 inches (29 m) of snow, thus surpassing the previous record holder, Mount Rainier in Washington, which received 1,122 in.

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Measurements are made manually at marked locations known as snow courses, and remotely using special scales called snow pillows.

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Spring snow melt is a major source of water supply to areas in temperate zones near mountains that catch and hold winter snow, especially those with a prolonged dry summer.

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Moisture exchange between the snowpack and the overlaying air mass is accompanied with latent heat transfer that is influenced by vapor pressure gradient and air wind.

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The difference in the environment in scales larger than a snowflake leads to the observed lack of correlation between the shapes of different snowflakes.

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New snow commonly has a density of between 5 and 15 percent of water.

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The snowpack absorbs solar shortwave radiation that is partially blocked by cloud cover and reflected by snow surface.

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Snow remains on the ground until it melts.

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At even colder temperatures, the snowflake design returns to the more common dendrite and plate.

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By late spring, snow densities typically reach a maximum of 50 percent of water.

Snowfall is 30 inches. The average US city gets 26 inches of snow per year. The number of days with any measurable precipitation is 57. On average, there are 214 sunny days per year in Omaha, Nebraska.

Snow leopards are one of the top predators in the high mountain food web of Central Asia. The snow leopard is an opportunistic predator capable of killing prey three times its weight. Snow leopards in the Himalaya and Tibet eat blue sheep (bharal).

Snow leopards are found at altitudes between 9,800 and 17,000 feet in the high, rugged mountains of Central Asia. Their range spans from Afghanistan to Kazakstan and Russia in the north to India and China in the east. China contains about 60% of snow leopard habitat.

A group of tigers is known as an ambush, a group of regular leopards is called a leap. Lions form prides.Apr 3, 2013

Snow leopards eat almost anything they can catch, often hunting animals three times their size. Their main sources of food include wild sheep and goats, pikas, hares, and game birds. In the summer, they eat mostly smaller prey, such as marmots.

Snow leopards are often killed by local farmers because they prey on livestock such as sheep, goats, horses, and yak calves. The animals which snow leopards would typically hunt—such as the Argali sheep—are also hunted by local communities.

Snow leopards prey upon the blue sheep (bharal) of Tibet and the Himalaya, as well as the mountain ibex found over most of the rest of their range. Though these powerful predators can kill animals three times their weight, they also eat smaller fare, such as marmots, hares, and game birds.

Snow leopards suffer from low natural density, large home ranges, dependence upon prey whose numbers are low or declining, and high vulnerability to poaching and other threats from humans. Human density in snow leopard habitat is among the lowest in the world, but our impacts are pervasive.

The snow leopard has not been reported to attack humans, and appears to be the least aggressive to humans of all big cats. As a result, they are easily driven away from livestock; they readily abandon their kills when threatened, and may not even defend themselves when attacked.

It is estimated that there are 4,500 to 7,500 snow leopards living in the mountains of central Asia. It is believed that 60% of the entire population of snow leopards live in China. The rough estimates shown here have been based on limited surveys that were done several decades ago.

Snow is formed when temperatures are low and there is moisture in the atmosphere in the form of tiny ice crystals. When these tiny ice crystals collide they stick together in clouds to become snowflakes. If enough ice crystals stick together, they'll become heavy enough to fall to the ground.Nov 19, 2014

Though ice and snow are both made up of water, there is a difference between the two. Snow is nothing but the frozen atmospheric vapour which falls in winters on earth as light flakes whereas ice is simply frozen water.Dec 3, 2005

Seasonal snow is an important part of Earth's climate system. Snow cover helps regulate the temperature of the Earth's surface, and once that snow melts, the water helps fill rivers and reservoirs in many regions of the world, especially the western United States.

Here's the types of snow you need to know about:Powder Snow. The sweetest type of snow there is. ... Crud. This is widely known as the next phase from powder. ... Crust. The name says it all. ... Slush. Long story short, slush is basically snow that has started to melt and therefore becomes more wet. ... Ice.

Graupel (German pronunciation: [ˈɡʁaʊpəl]; English: /ˈɡraʊpəl/), also called soft hail or snow pellets, is precipitation that forms when supercooled water droplets are collected and freeze on falling snowflakes, forming 2–5 mm (0.08–0.20 in) balls of rime.

Snow is water that crystallizes when the temperature gets below freezing. Sleet is when the temperature freezes, but then as it falls from the clouds it partially melts. Clouds actually contain 2 states of matter, solid and gas. Rain is liquid.

Water is known to exist in three different states; as a solid, liquid or gas. Clouds, snow, and rain are all made of up of some form of water. A cloud is comprised of tiny water droplets and/or ice crystals, a snowflake is an aggregate of many ice crystals, and rain is just liquid water.

Snow is precipitation in the form of ice crystals. It originates in clouds when temperatures are below the freezing point (0 degrees Celsius, or 32 degrees Fahrenheit), when water vapor in the atmosphere condenses directly into ice without going through the liquid stage.

Fresh fallen snow is usually safe to eat, as long as it's collected in a clean container or clean glove. ... Old snow can have dirt blown over the top of it, even if it's just a few days old, so it might not be safe to eat unless you melt it and boil the water.

Snow is a bunch of ice crystals stuck together. ... Snow reflects all the colors; no it doesn't absorb, transmit, or scatter any single color or wavelength more than any other. The “color” of all the light wavelengths combined equally is white.Dec 9, 2013

Occasionally, however, cold air from the interior of the continent pushes into the Puget Sound region and causes dramatic cold spells, ice and snow. While Seattle does not receive as much snow on average as other parts of the country, snowfall is not uncommon and can be very heavy.

Snowfall is 3 inches. The average US city gets 26 inches of snow per year. The number of days with any measurable precipitation is 100. On average, there are 144 sunny days per year in Portland, Oregon.