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Facts about Starch

Starch

A tray is filled with starch and leveled.

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Starch can be hydrolyzed into simpler carbohydrates by acids, various enzymes, or a combination of the two.

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Starch is common in the seeds, tubers, and roots of plants.

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The actual temperature depends on the type of starch.

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Clothing starch or laundry starch is a liquid that is prepared by mixing a vegetable starch in water (earlier preparations also had to be boiled) and is used in the laundering of clothes.

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Starch is the major polysaccharide in higher plants used for storage of carbohydrates.

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Animals and plants digest starch, converting it to glucose to serve as a source of energy.

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Starch readily binds water, and when that water is removed, polysaccharide chains aggregate, forming hydrogen bonds.

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Dirt and sweat from a person's neck and wrists would stick to the starch rather than fibers of the clothing, and would easily wash away along with the starch.

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Commonly used starches around the world are: arracacha, buckwheat, banana, barley, cassava, kudzu, oca, sago, sorghum, sweet potato, taro, and yams.

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After cellulose, starch is the most abundant polysaccharide in plant cells.

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A positive mold is then pressed into the starch leaving an impression of one hundred or so jelly babies.

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A modified food starch undergoes one or more chemical modifications that allow it to function properly under high heat and/or shear frequently encountered during food processing.

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Chefs have traditionally worn starched uniforms because the starch acts as a fire retardant.

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Starch glues are widely used in the bonding of paper, wood, and cotton.

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Willett and Stampfer (2003) found an association between a high intake of starch from refined grains and potatoes and the risk of type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease.

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Iodine is used in a common test for starch.

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Starch is a complex carbohydrate, specifically a polysaccharide, that is used by plants as a way to store glucose.

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The basic molecular structure of these are: (C6(H5O)10)n. As with cellulose and glycogen, starch contains the six-carbon sugar glucose as its single repeating unit.

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Starch was widely used in Europe in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries to stiffen the wide collars and ruffs of fine linen that surrounded the necks of the well-to-do.

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Edible beans, such as favas, lentils, and peas, are also rich in starch.

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Starch is a major source of carbohydrates in human diets, and can be obtained from seeds, fruits, nuts, corn, potatoes, and so forth.

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When a starch is pre-cooked, it can then be used to thicken cold foods.

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Starch

Under the microscope, starch grains show a distinctive Maltese cross effect (also known as “extinction cross” and birefringence) under polarized light.

image: i.ytimg.com
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The extent of conversion is typically quantified by dextrose equivalent (DE), which is roughly the fraction of the glycoside bonds in starch that have been broken.

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Self-discipline is called for in eating food high in starch, such as refined cereals, breads, and pastas, since overconsumption of complex carbohydrates correlates with obesity and medical problems.

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Starch

Starch granules are generally about 10-30 percent amylose and 70-90 percent amylopectin.

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Food starches are typically used as thickeners and stabilizers in foods such as puddings, custards, soups, sauces, gravies, pie fillings, and salad dressings, but have many other uses.

image: ey.com.sg

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