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Facts about Strontium

Strontium

Strontium titanate has a various applications in optics, strontium aluminate is used as a phosphorescent material, and strontium chloride may be added to toothpastes for people with sensitive teeth.

Strontium

The metallic form of strontium can be prepared by electrolysis of melted strontium chloride mixed with potassium chloride.

Strontium

Freshly prepared strontium has a bright silvery color, but on exposure to air it forms the yellow oxide.

Strontium

Pure strontium is extremely reactive, and finely divided strontium burns spontaneously.

Strontium

When finely powdered, however, the metal ignites spontaneously in air to produce both strontium oxide and strontium nitride.

Strontium

Strontium (chemical symbol Sr, atomic number 38) is a soft, silvery white metallic element that occurs naturally in the minerals celestite and strontianite.

Strontium

Classified as an alkaline earth metal, it reacts with water to produce the alkali strontium hydroxide.

Strontium

Strontium normally does not react with nitrogen below 380 °C, and forms only the oxide at room temperature.

Strontium

Three allotropes of strontium are known, with transition points at 235 and 540 °C.

Strontium

The human body absorbs strontium as if it were calcium.

Strontium

Strontium occurs commonly in nature amd has been estimated to be the fifteenth most abundant element on Earth, averaging 0.034 percent of all igneous rock.

Strontium

The element strontium itself was discovered in 1798, and metallic strontium was first isolated by Sir Humphry Davy in 1808, by the method of electrolysis.

Strontium

On contact with water, strontium reacts to produce strontium hydroxide and hydrogen gas.

Strontium

When burned, strontium salts produce an attractive red color, and they are therefore used in pyrotechnic displays and aerosol paints.

Strontium

To prevent it from reacting with air or water, strontium should be stored under kerosene.

Strontium

The properties of strontium are closest to those of calcium, and it can replace calcium in bone tissue.

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