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Facts about Sweat

Sweat

Apocrine sweat glands essentially serve as scent glands.

Sweat

Sweat or perspiration is a watery fluid excreted by the sweat (sudoriparous) glands of the skin of mammals.

Sweat

Sweat is exuded or excreted from the skins suboriferous glands—sweat glands.

Sweat

Human eccrine sweat is composed chiefly of water with various salts and organic compounds in solution.

Sweat

Animals with few sweat glands, such as dogs, accomplish similar temperature regulation results by panting, which evaporates water from the moist lining of the oral cavity and pharynx.

Sweat

Apocrine sweat glands are limited to only certain locations in humans, unlike eccrine glands, and they do not function in thermoregulation but rather serve as scent glands.

Sweat

Emotional stress, nervousness, and excitement increases the production of sweat from the apocrine glands, or more precisely, the sweat already present in the tubule is squeezed out.

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Sweat

Eccrine sweat glands are distributed over almost the entire surface of the body in humans and many other species, but are lacking in some marine and fur-bearing species.

Sweat

The urocanic acid in sweat also may offer protection for the skin against ultraviolet radiation (Kent 2006).

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Sweat

Rather, the chief value of a rose comes in its being a symbol of love and beauty.

Sweat

Eccrine sweat glands are coiled tubular glands derived from the outer layer of skin but extending into the inner layer.

Sweat

Sweating is part of the intricate complexity of animals.

Sweat

The sympathetic nervous system regulates sweating, although the process can be stimulated by parasympathetic drugs (Stocking and Gubili 2004).

Sweat

Among domestic animals, cattle have a high sweat rate of about 150 g/m2/h at 40 degrees centigrade, while sheep lose but 32 g/m2/h and dogs lose but an insignificant amount (Blood et al.

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Sweat

The sweat glands are controlled by sympathetic cholinergic nerves, which are controlled by a center in the hypothalamus.

Sweat

The dermis layer of the skin contains the sweat glands.

Sweat

Primates have armpits that sweat similarly to those of humans.

Sweat

Sweating occurs even in cool weather but is particularly pronounced in hot or humid conditions and during periods of stress or physical exertion.

Sweat

During exercise or in hot or humid conditions, the copious sweating in the armpits is not from the apocrine glands but actually from eccrine glands located in the same region.

Sweat

Sweating can serve both an excretory role (nitrogenous excretion, removal of excess water, and so forth) and a role in temperature regulation.

Sweat

The hypothalamus senses core temperature directly, and also has input from temperature receptors in the skin and modifies the sweat output, along with other thermoregulatory processes.

Sweat

The secretions of the apocrine sweat glands are thicker and more stick than the watery fluid of the eccrine sweat glands and contains fatty materials.

Sweat

Sweat contains primarily water, but also salts and metabolic waste products—primarily sodium chloride, urea, lactic acid, and potassium ions (Blood et al.

Sweat

Sweating (as well as perspiration) refers to the production, secretion, and evaporation of sweat.

Sweat

Sweat serves an excretory function for releasing excess water and waste products.

Sweat

Sweat contains water, sodium chloride, and small amounts of urea, lactic acid, and potassium salts, and is a much less concentrated fluid than blood plasma (Blood et al.

Sweat

Primates have armpits that sweat similarly to those of humans.

Sweat

The sweat of other species generally differs in composition.