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Facts about World War

On September 1, 1939, Hitler invaded Poland from the west; two days later, France and Britain declared war on Germany, beginning World War II. On September 17, Soviet troops invaded Poland from the east.

Among the causes of World War II were Italian fascism in the 1920s, Japanese militarism and invasions of China in the 1930s, and especially the political takeover in 1933 of Germany by Hitler and his Nazi Party and its aggressive foreign policy.

After securing the neutrality of the Soviet Union (through the August 1939 German-Soviet Pact of nonaggression), Germany started World War II by invading Poland on September 1, 1939. Britain and France responded by declaring war on Germany on September 3.

Oldest living World War II veteran Richard Overton turns 111. The world's oldest living World War II veteran, Richard Overton, just celebrated his 111th birthday with a huge block party.May 12, 2017

World War I began in 1914, after the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, and lasted until 1918. During the conflict, Germany, Austria-Hungary, Bulgaria and the Ottoman Empire (the Central Powers) fought against Great Britain, France, Russia, Italy, Romania, Japan and the United States (the Allied Powers).

The immediate cause of World War I that made the aforementioned items come into play (alliances, imperialism, militarism, nationalism) was the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria-Hungary. In June 1914, a Serbian-nationalist terrorist group called the Black Hand sent groups to assassinate the Archduke.

There was no single event that caused World War One (WW1). War happened because of several different events that took place in the years building up to 1914. Firstly, there was the role of empire. Great Britain, Germany, Austria-Hungary and Russia all had empires.Jun 29, 2016

The trigger for the war was the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria, heir to the throne of Austria-Hungary, by Yugoslav nationalist Gavrilo Princip in Sarajevo on 28 June 1914. ... Within weeks the major powers were at war, and the conflict soon spread around the world.

The first country to declare war in WWI was Austria-Hungary. That country issued an ultimatum to Serbia after the assassination of the Austro-Hungarian Archduke Franz Ferdinand. When Serbia rejected the ultimatum, Austria-Hungary declared war on July 28. Austria-Hungary was an ally of Germany.

Who was to blame for the First World War? As every schoolboy should know, it was the militant Serbian nationalist who assassinated Archduke Franz Ferdinand, the Austro-Hungarian prince whose killing led to his nation's declaration of war on Serbia, which had a domino effect as other countries entering the conflict.Jan 7, 2014

After securing the neutrality of the Soviet Union (through the August 1939 German-Soviet Pact of nonaggression), Germany started World War II by invading Poland on September 1, 1939. Britain and France responded by declaring war on Germany on September 3.

The simplest answer is that the immediate cause was the assassination of Franz Ferdinand, the archduke of Austria-Hungary. His death at the hands of Gavrilo Princip – a Serbian nationalist with ties to the secretive military group known as the Black Hand – propelled the major European military powers towards war.

The direct cause of WWI was the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand at Sarajevo on 28 June 1914. However historians feel that a number of factors contributed to the rivalry between the Great powers that allowed war on such a wide-scale to break out.Apr 20, 2016

The aircraft played a pivotal role for all sides of World War 1 when the conflict began in 1914. Early forms were typically unarmed and used in the reconnaissance role until personal weapons were added. From there, the machine gun was finally fixed to these aircraft to create the 'fighter' aeroplane.

Soldiers also made dugouts and funk holes in the side of the trenches to give them some protection from the weather and enemy fire. The front-line trenches were also protected by barbed-wire entanglements and machine-gun posts. Short trenches called saps were dug from the front-trench into No-Man's Land.

Trench warfare is a form of land warfare using occupied fighting lines consisting largely of trenches, in which troops are significantly protected from the enemy's small arms fire and are substantially sheltered from artillery. The most prominent case of trench warfare is the Western Front in World War I.

The German invasion of Poland on September 1, 1939, unleashed the European war. Italy entered World War II on the Axis side on June 10, 1940, as the defeat of France became apparent. In July 1940, just weeks after the defeat of France, Hitler decided that Nazi Germany would attack the Soviet Union the following spring.

This page provides a quick sketch of Italy's role in WWII; the guidebook has much more information. In June 1940, Benito Mussolini chose to ally Italy's forces with those of Adolf Hitler. Soon German and Italian armies were battling Allied troops on several fronts.

On 3 September 1939, two days after Hitler invaded Poland, Australia entered World War II. ON SUNDAY 3 SEPTEMBER 1939, Australians tuned in to their radios to hear Prime Minister Robert Menzies make a fateful announcement.Sep 2, 2011

Woodrow Wilson

Although the war began with Nazi Germany's attack on Poland in September 1939, the United States did not enter the war until after the Japanese bombed the American fleet in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on December 7, 1941. ... The war ended with the Axis powers' unconditional surrender in 1945.

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