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Facts about Zanzibar

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Zanzibar is also the home of the endemic Zanzibar Red Colobus and the elusive Zanzibar Leopard.

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That year's census recorded Michigan as having the 8th largest population in the US.

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Zanzibar's main industries are spices (which include cloves, nutmeg, cinnamon and pepper), raffia, and tourism.

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Zanzibar is sometimes referred to as the "Spice Islands," a term that is also associated with the Maluku Islands in Indonesia.

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The Island of Unguja comprises three administrative regions: Zanzibar Central/South, Zanzibar North and Zanzibar Urban/West.

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In 1698 Zanzibar fell under the control of the Sultanate of Oman, which developed an economy of trade and cash crops, with a ruling Arab elite.

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Zanzibar

Prior to the development of eastern African mainland ports, Zanzibar was the trade focus of the region and enjoyed an important entrep—Ąt trade.

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Zanzibar exports spices, seaweed and fine raffia (palms used in textiles and construction).

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Stone Town, Zanzibar's capital city, is a place of winding lanes, circular towers, carved wooden doors, raised terraces and beautiful mosques.

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The presence of microlithic tools attests to 20,000 years of human occupation of Zanzibar.

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Zanzibaris are an eclectic mixture of ethnic backgrounds, indicative of the islands' colorful history.

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Zanzibar's Stone Town has been designated a World Heritage Site by UNESCO.

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Fauna include the African pig, civet cat, forest duiker, lemur, leopard (a variety peculiar to Zanzibar), mongoose, two species of monkey, and pigmy antelope.

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Zanzibar was originally populated by Bantu-speaking peoples, the Hadimu and Tumbatu.

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The capital of Zanzibar, located on the island of Unguja, is Zanzibar City.

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Zanzibar was the first region in Africa to introduce color television, in 1973.

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The death of one sultan and the succession of another of whom the British did not approve led to the Anglo-Zanzibar War.

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During the Age of Exploration, the Portuguese Empire was the first European power to gain control of Zanzibar, and kept it for nearly 200 years.

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The third pillar of the economy was slaves, giving Zanzibar an important place in the Arab slave trade, the Indian Ocean equivalent of the better-known Triangular Trade.

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Pemba Island is the only island apart from Zanzibar that still produces cloves on a major basis which is a primary source of spice income for the islands.

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A month later, the bloody Zanzibar Revolution, in which several thousand Arabs and Indians were killed and thousands more expelled, established the Republic of Zanzibar and Pemba.

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The archipelago was once the separate state of Zanzibar, which united with Tanganyika to form Tanzania (derived from the two names), and still enjoys a high degree of autonomy within the union.

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The relationship between Britain and the nearest relevant colonial power, Germany, was formalized by the 1890 Helgoland-Zanzibar Treaty, in which Germany pledged not to interfere with British interests in insular Zanzibar.

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Zanzibar (Unguja) island, the largest in the archipelago, covers 637 square miles (1,651 square km), while Pemba, the next largest, covers 350 square miles (906 square km).

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Zanzibar is a conservative, Sunni Muslim society, although there are also followers of Christianity and Hinduism.

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Zanzibar City was the main trading port of the East African slave trade, with about 50,000 slaves a year passing through the city.

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Stone Town, Zanzibar's capital city, is a place of winding lanes, circular towers, carved wooden doors, raised terraces and beautiful mosques.