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How serious is thyroid cancer?

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According to the National Cancer Institute, there are over 56,000 new cases of thyroid cancer in the US each year, and the majority of those diagnosed are papillary thyroid cancer—the most common type of thyroid cancer. Females are more likely to have thyroid cancer at a ratio of 3:1. read more

Thyroid cancer is serious, although it is treatable. Papillary thyroid cancer usually grows slowly, but there is a risk that it could spread to nearby lymph nodes and then other parts of the body. However, with the right treatment, most people recovery from papillary thyroid cancer. read more

more fortunately, most forms of thyroid cancer are “easily” treated (relatively). often treatment involves removal of the thyroid, which requires daily thyroid hormone replacement pills (a fairly “minor” process). you will need to see an endocrinologist from then on. sometimes, radioactive iodine treatment is required, which is a serious process, but one which would likely leave you back to normal a few weeks after the treatment is done. read more

Medullary cancer is found in about 10% of all thyroid cancer cases. This type is more likely to run in your family and is linked to problems with other glands. It’s also more likely to be found at an early stage because it produces a hormone called calcitonin, which doctors keep an eye out for in blood test results. read more

The thyroid is located at the base of the neck, below the Adam’s apple, and its shape resembles that of a butterfly. When cells grow out of control, cancer can start in the thyroid, which is the gland that helps regulate many of the body’s important functions. read more

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Certainly miscarriage is not invariably related to low thyroid function. There are many other possible causes. Yet soon after thyroid therapy first became available, it was found that patients with a history of miscarriages often had a history compatible with thyroid deficiency and that full-term pregnancies might follow treatment with thyroid.
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