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Is there an upper limit to wind speed on hurricanes?

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30, 2017. But physics dictates there must be a limit. Based on ocean and atmospheric conditions on Earth nowadays, the estimated maximum potential for hurricanes is about 190 mph (305 km/h), according to a 1998 calculation by Kerry Emanuel, a climatologist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. read more

The storm is bigger, faster and stronger than Hurricane Andrew. Bigger and faster means more devastation and danger. The problem is that Irma is increasingly likely to rip into heavily populated South Florida early Sunday. read more

When considering the upper limit, we must allow for a point at which the storm becomes a Hypercane. read more

Category 5 on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane scale has no upper bound, on paper. But in theory, winds from a powerful hurricane could blow the scale out of the water, scientists say. There is no such thing as a Category 6 storm, in part because once winds reach Category 5 status, it doesn't matter what you call it, it's really, really, bad. read more

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Hurricanes. An Inside Look At Hurricane Andrew: Process
Source: questgarden.com

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