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Top Ten Biggest Sharks

Helicoprion​
Helicoprion​

Helicoprion is a long-lived genus of extinct, shark-like eugeneodontid holocephalid fish. Almost all fossil specimens are of spirally arranged clusters of the individuals' teeth, called "tooth whorls"— the cartilaginous skull, spine, and other structural elements have not been preserved in the fossil record, leaving scientists to make educated guesses as to its anatomy and behavior.

Ptychodus​
Ptychodus​

The Great White Shark is the largest of the predatory sharks in the ocean. Great White Sharks prefer the cooler waters Northeast Atlantic, Northern Pacific, and the Southern Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. The largest concentration of Great Whites is around Dyer Island in South Africa.

Megalodon​
Megalodon​

Megalodon (Carcharocles megalodon), meaning "big tooth," is an extinct species of shark that lived approximately 23 to 2.6 million years ago (mya), during the Early Miocene to the end of the Pliocene.

Pacific ​Sleeper Shark​
Pacific ​Sleeper Shark​

The Pacific sleeper shark (Somniosus pacificus) is a sleeper shark of the family Somniosidae, found in the North Pacific on continental shelves and slopes in Arctic and temperate waters between latitudes 70°N and 22°N, from the surface to 2,000 metres (6,600 ft) deep.

Tiger Shark​
Tiger Shark​

This huge mako shark was actually caught during filming for a TV show, and it's heavy enough to displace a couple of the sharks on this list. For perspective, keep in mind that the average mako shark weights around 300 pounds at adulthood.

Great White ​Shark​
Great White ​Shark​

In 1983, Canadian David McKendrick caught a 20.3 ft (6.1 m) great white shark at Prince Edward Island. This length has been verified by the Canadian Shark Research Centre. In 1987, Alfredo Cutajar caught a big great white off the coast of Malta that was reportedly measured to be 7.13 meters long.

source: owlcation.com
Basking Shark​
Basking Shark​

The basking shark (Cetorhinus maximus) is the second-largest living shark, after the whale shark, and one of three plankton-eating shark species, along with the whale shark and megamouth shark. Adults typically reach 6–8 m (20–26 ft) in length. They are usually greyish-brown, with mottled skin.

image: redbull.com
Whale Shark​
Whale Shark​

Sharks come in all sizes. The largest is the whale shark, which has been known to get as large as 18 meters (60 feet). The smallest fits in your hand. And the great white shark is somewhere in the middle. See photos and learn more about the wide diversity of sharks, read 5 reasons to revere sharks, and see even more articles about sharks.

source: ocean.si.edu
Cretoxyrhina ​Mantelli​
Cretoxyrhina ​Mantelli​

Cretoxyrhina was the largest shark in its time and was among the chief predators of the seas. Fossil records revealed that it preyed on a variety of marine animals, such as mosasaurs like Tylosaurus, plesiosaurs like Elasmosaurus, bony fish like Xiphactinus, and protostegid turtles like Archelon.

image: alamy.com