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Top Ten Castles in uk

Leeds Castle​
Leeds Castle​

Leeds Castle is in Kent, England, 5 miles (8 km) southeast of Maidstone. A castle has been on the site since 1086. In the 13th century it came into the hands of King Edward I, for whom it became a favourite residence; in the 16th century, Henry VIII used it as a dwelling for his first wife, Catherine of Aragon.

Bodiam ​Castle​
Bodiam ​Castle​

Bodiam Castle (/ ˈ b oʊ d i ə m /) is a 14th-century moated castle near Robertsbridge in East Sussex, England. It was built in 1385 by Sir Edward Dalyngrigge, a former knight of Edward III, with the permission of Richard II, ostensibly to defend the area against French invasion during the Hundred Years' War.

image: reddit.com
Warwick ​Castle​
Warwick ​Castle​

Warwick Castle is a medieval castle developed from an original built by William the Conqueror in 1068. Warwick is the county town of Warwickshire, England, situated on a bend of the River Avon. The original wooden motte-and-bailey castle was rebuilt in stone in the 12th century.

Alnwick ​Castle​
Alnwick ​Castle​

Alnwick Castle (/ ˈ æ n ɪ k / ( listen)) is a castle and stately home in Alnwick in the English county of Northumberland. It is the seat of the Duke of Northumberland, built following the Norman conquest, and renovated and remodelled a number of times.

image: motaen.com
Dover Castle​
Dover Castle​

Dover Castle is a medieval castle in Dover, Kent, England. It was founded in the 11th century and has been described as the "Key to England" due to its defensive significance throughout history. It is the largest castle in England.

Bamburgh ​Castle​
Bamburgh ​Castle​

Bamburgh Castle. Bamburgh Castle is a castle on the northeast coast of England, by the village of Bamburgh in Northumberland. It is a Grade I listed building. The site was originally the location of a Celtic Brittonic fort known as Din Guarie and may have been the capital of the kingdom of Bernicia from its foundation in c. 420 to 547.

image: fanpop.com
Conwy Castle​
Conwy Castle​

Conwy Castle (Welsh: Castell Conwy, English: Conway Castle) is a medieval fortification in Conwy, on the north coast of Wales. It was built by Edward I, during his conquest of Wales, between 1283 and 1289.

image: reddit.com
Caernarfon ​Castle​
Caernarfon ​Castle​

Caernarfon Castle (English spelling Caernarvon) is one of the top tourist attractions in the whole of Wales – and one of the most impressive castles in the whole of the UK. Why so impressive? Well, the entire little fishing town of Caernarfon is wrapped within the castle’s mighty stone walls.

image: fanpop.com
Edinburgh ​Castle​
Edinburgh ​Castle​

Edinburgh Castle is a historic fortress which dominates the skyline of the city of Edinburgh, Scotland, from its position on the Castle Rock. Archaeologists have established human occupation of the rock since at least the Iron Age (2nd century AD), although the nature of the early settlement is unclear.

Dunstanburgh ​Castle​
Dunstanburgh ​Castle​

Dunstanburgh Castle is a 14th-century fortification on the coast of Northumberland in northern England, between the villages of Craster and Embleton. The castle was built by Earl Thomas of Lancaster between 1313 and 1322, taking advantage of the site's natural defences and the existing earthworks of an Iron Age fort.

Warkworth ​Castle​
Warkworth ​Castle​

Warkworth Castle is a ruined medieval building in the village of the same name in the English county of Northumberland. The village and castle occupy a loop of the River Coquet, less than a mile from England's north-east coast.

Rochester ​Castle​
Rochester ​Castle​

Rochester Castle stands on the east bank of the River Medway in Rochester, Kent, South East England. The 12th-century keep or stone tower, which is the castle's most prominent feature, is one of the best preserved in England or France.

Raby Castle​
Raby Castle​

Raby Castle (grid reference) is near Staindrop in County Durham, England, among 200 acres (810,000 m 2) of deer park. It was built by John Neville, 3rd Baron Neville de Raby, between approximately 1367 and 1390. Cecily Neville, the mother of the Kings Edward IV and Richard III, was born here.

Berkeley ​Castle​
Berkeley ​Castle​

Berkeley Castle (/ ˈ b ɑːr k l i / BARK-lee; historically sometimes spelt Berkley Castle or Barkley Castle) is a castle in the town of Berkeley, Gloucestershire, UK (grid reference). The castle's origins date back to the 11th century and it has been designated by English Heritage as a grade I listed building.

Stirling Castle​
Stirling Castle​

Stirling Castle, located in Stirling, is one of the largest and most important castles in Scotland, both historically and architecturally. The castle sits atop Castle Hill, an intrusive crag, which forms part of the Stirling Sill geological formation.

Carisbrooke ​Castle​
Carisbrooke ​Castle​

Carisbrooke was the strongest castle on the Island; though it is visible from some distance, it does not dominate the countryside like many other castles. There are traces of a Roman fort underneath the later buildings. Seventy-one steps lead up to the keep; the reward is a fine view.

Ludlow Castle​
Ludlow Castle​

Ludlow Castle is a ruined medieval fortification in the town of the same name in the English county of Shropshire, standing on a promontory overlooking the River Teme. The castle was probably founded by Walter de Lacy after the Norman conquest and was one of the first stone castles to be built in England.

Lincoln Castle​
Lincoln Castle​

Lincoln Castle is a major Norman castle constructed in Lincoln, England during the late 11th century by William the Conqueror on the site of a pre-existing Roman fortress. The castle is unusual in that it has two mottes. It is only one of two such castles in the country, the other being at Lewes in Sussex.

Dunnottar ​Castle​
Dunnottar ​Castle​

Dunnottar Castle, and the headland on which is stands, was designated as a scheduled monument in 1970. In 1972 twelve of the structures at Dunnottar were listed. Three buildings are listed at category A as being of "national importance": the keep; the entrance gateway; and Benholm's Lodging.

Tattershall ​Castle, Lincolnshire​
Tattershall ​Castle, Lincolnshire​

Tattershall Castle has its origins in either a stone castle or a fortified manor house, built by Robert de Tattershall in 1231. This was largely rebuilt in brick, and greatly expanded, by Ralph, 3rd Lord Cromwell, Treasurer of England, between 1430 and 1450.

Chirk Castle​
Chirk Castle​

The castle was bought by Sir Thomas Myddelton in 1593 for £5,000 (approx. £11 million as of 2008). His son, Thomas Myddelton of Chirk Castle was a Parliamentarian during the English Civil War, but became a Royalist during the 'Cheshire rising' of 1659 led by George Booth, 1st Baron Delamer.

Lewes Castle​
Lewes Castle​

Lewes Castle: One of the Oldest Castles in England Lewes Castle was one of the very first fortresses to be built in England, directly following the Norman conquest of 1066. It’s a brilliant example of a Motte and Bailey castle – probably one of the best examples in the whole of the UK.

Carlisle ​Castle​
Carlisle ​Castle​

Carlisle, England. Carlisle Castle. Carlisle Castle is situated in Carlisle, in the English county of Cumbria, near the ruins of Hadrian's Wall. The castle is over 900 years old and has been the scene of many historical episodes in British history.

Castle Drogo​
Castle Drogo​

Castle Drogo is a country house and castle near Drewsteignton, Devon, England. Constructed between 1911 and 1930, it was the last castle to be built in England. The client was Julius Drewe, the hugely successful founder of the Home and Colonial Stores.

Lindisfarne ​Castle​
Lindisfarne ​Castle​

Lindisfarne Castle. Lindisfarne Castle is a 16th-century castle located on Holy Island, near Berwick-upon-Tweed, Northumberland, England, much altered by Sir Edwin Lutyens in 1901. The island is accessible from the mainland at low tide by means of a causeway.

Belvoir Castle​
Belvoir Castle​

Belvoir Castle (/ ˈ b iː v ər / ( listen) BEE-vər) is a stately home in the English county of Leicestershire, overlooking the Vale of Belvoir (grid reference). It is a Grade I listed building. A corner of the castle is still used as the family home of the Manners family and remains the seat of the Dukes of Rutland, most of whom are buried in the grounds of the mausoleum there.

Durham ​Castle​
Durham ​Castle​

Durham Castle is a Norman castle in the city of Durham, England, which has been wholly occupied since 1840 by University College, Durham. It is open to the general public to visit, but only through guided tours, since it is in use as a working building and is home to over 100 students.

Colchester ​Castle​
Colchester ​Castle​

Colchester Castle, front Colchester Castle, front and SE corner Colchester Castle in Colchester, Essex, England, is an example of a largely complete Norman castle.

Pendennis ​Castle​
Pendennis ​Castle​

Pendennis Castle is an artillery fort constructed by Henry VIII near Falmouth, Cornwall, England between 1540 and 1542. It formed part of the King's Device programme to protect against invasion from France and the Holy Roman Empire, and defended the Carrick Roads waterway at the mouth of the River Fal.

Restormel ​Castle​
Restormel ​Castle​

Restormel Castle (Cornish: Kastel Rostorrmel) lies by the River Fowey near Lostwithiel in Cornwall, England, UK. It is one of the four chief Norman castles of Cornwall, the others being Launceston, Tintagel and Trematon.

Cardiff Castle​
Cardiff Castle​

Cardiff Castle (Welsh: Castell Caerdydd) is a medieval castle and Victorian Gothic revival mansion located in the city centre of Cardiff, Wales. The original motte and bailey castle was built in the late 11th century by Norman invaders on top of a 3rd-century Roman fort.

Oxford Castle​
Oxford Castle​

Oxford Castle is a large, partly ruined Norman medieval castle on the western side of central Oxford in Oxfordshire, England. Most of the original moated, wooden motte and bailey castle was replaced in stone in the 11th century and played an important role in the conflict of the Anarchy.

Carrickfergus ​Castle​
Carrickfergus ​Castle​

Carrickfergus Castle (from the Irish Carraig Ḟergus or "cairn of Fergus", the name "Fergus" meaning "strong man") is a Norman Irish castle in Northern Ireland, situated in the town of Carrickfergus in County Antrim, on the northern shore of Belfast Lough.

Pembroke ​Castle​
Pembroke ​Castle​

Pembroke Castle (Welsh: Castell Penfro) is a medieval castle in Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, West Wales. The castle was the original family seat of the Earldom of Pembroke. A Grade I listed building since 1951, it underwent major restoration during the early 20th century.

Glamis Castle​
Glamis Castle​

Glamis Castle is situated beside the village of Glamis / ˈ ɡ l ɑː m z / in Angus, Scotland.It is the home of the Earl and Countess of Strathmore and Kinghorne, and is open to the public.

Launceston ​Castle​
Launceston ​Castle​

Castle Lodge, Launceston, Cornwall, PL15 7DR Set on a large natural mound, Launceston Castle dominates the surrounding landscape. Begun soon after the Norman Conquest, its focus is an unusual keep consisting of a 13th-century round tower built by Richard, Earl of Cornwall, inside an earlier circular shell-keep.

Linlithgow ​Palace​
Linlithgow ​Palace​

Linlithgow Palace was built and added to over two centuries by the Stewart kings, resulting in a superb Renaissance residence. This impressive retreat was an ideal place for royals to break the journey between Edinburgh Castle and Stirling Castle.

image: castleuk.net
Richmond ​Castle​
Richmond ​Castle​

With its breathtaking views of the Yorkshire Dales, Richmond Castle fully deserves its place as one of the finest tourist attractions in North Yorkshire. The castle was originally built to subdue the unruly North of England it is one of the greatest Norman fortresses in Britain.

Conisbrough ​Castle​
Conisbrough ​Castle​

Conisbrough Castle is a medieval fortification in Conisbrough, South Yorkshire, England. The castle was initially built in the 11th century by William de Warenne, the Earl of Surrey, after the Norman conquest of England in 1066.

Harlech ​Castle​
Harlech ​Castle​

Harlech Castle is one of the most threatening castles in Wales. Discover the history of this beast, alongside photos and legends. Harlech Castle is one of the most threatening castles in Wales.

Powis Castle​
Powis Castle​

Powis Castle (Welsh: Castell Powys) is a medieval castle, fortress and grand country mansion near Welshpool, in Powys, Wales. It is known for housing the treasures that were brought home by Robert Clive and his son, Edward Clive from India. The Clives obtained them during their service with the British East India Company.

Lancaster ​Castle​
Lancaster ​Castle​

Lancaster Castle is a medieval castle in Lancaster in the English county of Lancashire. Its early history is unclear, but may have been founded in the 11th century on the site of a Roman fort overlooking a crossing of the River Lune.

Tamworth ​Castle​
Tamworth ​Castle​

Tamworth Castle is fun-sized Norman castle at the heart of Tamworth, Staffordshire. The town of Tamworth is a stone’s throw from Birmingham (England’s second city, depending on who you listen to) and it’s a pleasant little place.

Totnes Castle​
Totnes Castle​

Totnes Castle is one of the best preserved examples of a Norman motte and bailey castle in England. It is situated in the town of Totnes on the River Dart in Devon. The surviving stone keep and curtain wall date from around the 14th century.

image: torquay.com
Prudhoe ​Castle​
Prudhoe ​Castle​

Prudhoe Castle /ˈprʌdə/ is a ruined medieval English castle situated on the south bank of the River Tyne at Prudhoe, Northumberland, England. It is a Scheduled Ancient Monument and a Grade I listed building.

Balmoral ​Castle​
Balmoral ​Castle​

Balmoral Castle (/ b æ l ˈ m ɒr əl /) is a large estate house in Royal Deeside, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, near the village of Crathie, 6.2 miles (10 km) west of Ballater and 6.8 miles (11 km) east of Braemar.

Chepstow ​Castle​
Chepstow ​Castle​

Chepstow Castle (Welsh: Castell Cas-gwent) at Chepstow, Monmouthshire, Wales is the oldest surviving post-Roman stone fortification in Britain. Located above cliffs on the River Wye, construction began in 1067 under the instruction of the Norman Lord William FitzOsbern.

Pontefract ​Castle​
Pontefract ​Castle​

Pontefract Castle, in Yorkshire, England (or Pomfret Castle, as it was known at its time) used to be the most important, and most terrifying castle in the whole of Early Modern England. However, visitors today would find this unbelievable to understand.

Canterbury ​Castle​
Canterbury ​Castle​

Canterbury Castle is a Norman Castle in Canterbury, Kent, England (grid reference TR14545743).[1] It is a five-minute walk from Canterbury East Station and main bus station around City Wall.

Longtown ​Castle​
Longtown ​Castle​

The Longtown Castles Project, a local community project supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund, are conducting some interesting research and excavations to discover more about the origins of Longtown Castle and nearby Ponthendre Motte.

Nottingham ​Castle​
Nottingham ​Castle​

Nottingham Castle is a castle in Nottingham, England. It is located in a commanding position on a natural promontory known as "Castle Rock", with cliffs 130 feet (40 m) high to the south and west. In the Middle Ages it was a major royal fortress and occasional royal residence.