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Top Ten Coffee Producers

Colombia - 810,000 Metric Tons (1,785,744,000 Pounds)
Colombia - 810,000 Metric Tons (1,785,744,000 Pounds)

Coffee plantations currently cover over 1 million hectares of Indonesia's territory, with over 90% of the cropland being worked by small-scale producers. 3. Colombia - 810,000 metric tons (1,785,744,000 pounds) Coffee from Colombia is famous worldwide. However, climate has recently been playing a negative role in Colombian coffee production.

Vietnam - 1,650,000 Metric Tons (3,637,627,000 Pounds)
Vietnam - 1,650,000 Metric Tons (3,637,627,000 Pounds)

Vietnam - 1,650,000 metric tons (3,637,627,000 pounds) While many are familiar with Vietnamese coffee, a signature drink where the coffee is mixed with sweetened condensed milk, Vietnam is the second largest coffee producing nation in the world – 1,650,000 metric tons in 2016 alone.

Brazil - 2,595,000 Metric ton (5,714,381,000 Pounds)
Brazil - 2,595,000 Metric ton (5,714,381,000 Pounds)

Brazil - 2,595,000 metric ton (5,714,381,000 pounds) Brazil is the world's largest coffee producer. In 2016, Brazil produced a staggering 2,595,000 metric tons of coffee beans.

Brazil
Brazil

Outlining the Brazilian Coffee Industry and Exports. Brazil is by far the largest producer of coffee in the world, controlling more than 30% of the international production. Coffee is one of the most important agribusiness commodity, maintaining steady and growing value in the stock market.

Vietnam
Vietnam

Vietnamese coffee producers blend multiple varieties of beans for different flavor characteristics and balance, or to reduce production cost. Typically the coffee is prepared in single servings in single-cup filter/brewers known as phin. Generally the coffee is served table-side while it is still brewing.

image: snipview.com
Colombia
Colombia

Coffee production in Colombia has a reputation as producing mild, well balanced coffee beans. Colombia's average annual coffee production of 11.5 million bags is the third total highest in the world, after Brazil and Vietnam; though highest in terms of the arabica bean.

Indonesia
Indonesia

Indonesia was the fourth largest producer of coffee in the world in 2014. Coffee in Indonesia began with its colonial history, and has played an important part in the growth of the country.

Ethiopia
Ethiopia

Coffee production in Ethiopia is a longstanding tradition which dates back to dozens of centuries. Ethiopia is where Coffea arabica, the coffee plant, originates. The plant is now grown in various parts of the world; Ethiopia itself accounts for around 3% of the global coffee market.

United States - Hawaii
United States - Hawaii

When the United States annexed Hawaii in 1898 (forming the territory of Hawaii), the dropping of tariffs meant sugar was even more profitable, and some coffee trees were torn up. Prices dropped in 1899 and 1900, which wiped out some remaining plantations. In 1916, production was about 2.7 million pounds, while sugar continued to expand.

Mexico
Mexico

The coffee production in Mexico is the world's 8th largest with 252,000 metric tonnes produced in 2009, and is mainly concentrated to the south central to southern regions of the country. The coffee is mainly arabica, which grows particularly well in the coastal region of Soconusco, Chiapas, near the border of Guatemala.

Puerto Rico
Puerto Rico

Coffee plantation in Puerto Rico Coffee production in Puerto Rico has a checkered history between the 18th century and the present. Output peaked during the Spanish colonial rule but slumped when the island was annexed by the United States in 1898.

Guatemala
Guatemala

Coffee production in Guatemala began to develop in the 1850s. Coffee is an important element of Guatemala's economy. Guatemala was Central America's top producer of coffee for most of the 20th and the beginning of the 21st century, until being overtaken by Honduras in 2011.

Costa Rica
Costa Rica

Costa Rica is the 13th-largest producer of coffee in the world, churning out around 1.5 million bags every year. 90 percent of the coffee is exported, with the revenue accounting for around 11 percent of Costa Rica’s export earnings.

source: anywhere.com

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