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Top Ten Illusions

Curvature Blindness Illusion
Curvature Blindness Illusion

Curvature Blindness Illusion. A new article published int he journal, i-Perception presents a new optical illusion called “curvature blindness illusion”. It is written by a researcher, Kohske Takahashi. Look at the image below. You can see in the top left on the white background, every set of lines has the same curve.

The Spinning Dancer Illusion
The Spinning Dancer Illusion

The famous spinning dancer optical illusion is an ambiguous image whose direction can be determined by your visual preference. The famous spinning dancer optical illusion is an ambiguous image whose direction can be determined by your visual preference.

Cafe Wall Illusion
Cafe Wall Illusion

The café wall illusion is a geometrical-optical illusion in which the parallel straight dividing lines between staggered rows with alternating black and white "bricks" appear to be sloped. It was first described under the name Kindergarten illusion in 1898, and re-discovered in 1973 by Richard Gregory.

Simultaneous Contrast Illusion
Simultaneous Contrast Illusion

Black looks black and white looks white regardless of the level of illumination. The putative mechanism for brightness constancy is light adaptation - retinal responses depend on average intensity. Most of the time this works great. However, sometimes it screws up, e.g., yielding the simultaneous brightness contrast illusion.

source: cns.nyu.edu
Penrose Stairs
Penrose Stairs

Penrose stairs The Penrose stairs or Penrose steps, also dubbed the impossible staircase, is an impossible object created by Lionel Penrose and his son Roger Penrose. A variation on the Penrose triangle, it is a two-dimensional depiction of a staircase in which the stairs make four 90-degree turns as they ascend or descend yet form a continuous loop, so that a person could climb them forever and never get any higher.

Ponzo Illusion
Ponzo Illusion

The Ponzo illusion is a geometrical-optical illusion that was first demonstrated by the Italian psychologist Mario Ponzo (1882–1960) in 1911. He suggested that the human mind judges an object's size based on its background.

Necker Cube
Necker Cube

The Necker cube is an optical illusion first published as a rhomboid in 1832 by Swiss crystallographer Louis Albert Necker. It is a simple wire-frame drawing of a cube with no visual cues as to its orientation, so it can be interpreted to have either the lower-left or the upper-right square as its front side.

The Rabbit Duck Head
The Rabbit Duck Head

The rabbit–duck illusion is an ambiguous image in which a rabbit or a duck can be seen. The earliest known version is an unattributed drawing from the 23 October 1892 issue of Fliegende Blätter, a German humour magazine.