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Top Ten Novels

Le Rouge et le Noir by Stendhal
Le Rouge et le Noir by Stendhal

Le Rouge et le Noir (French pronunciation: [lə ʁuʒ e lə nwaʁ], French for The Red and the Black), is a historical psychological novel in two volumes by Stendhal, published in 1830.

Le Père Goriot by Honoré de Balzac
Le Père Goriot by Honoré de Balzac

Le Père Goriot, (French: “Father Goriot”) novel by Honoré de Balzac, originally published in French in the Revue de Paris in 1834 and published in book form in 1835. The novel is considered one of the best works of Balzac’s panoramic series La Comédie humaine (“The Human Comedy”), and it was the first to feature characters that would reappear in later novels.

David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
David Copperfield by Charles Dickens

David Copperfield is the eighth novel by Charles Dickens. The novel's full title is The Personal History, Adventures, Experience and Observation of David Copperfield the Younger of Blunderstone Rookery (Which He Never Meant to Publish on Any Account).

Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert

Madame Bovary (full French title: Madame Bovary.Mœurs de province) is the debut novel of French writer Gustave Flaubert, published in 1856.The character lives beyond her means in order to escape the banalities and emptiness of provincial life.

Moby-Dick by Herman Melville
Moby-Dick by Herman Melville

Herman Melville has 674 books on Goodreads with 929566 ratings. Herman Melville’s most popular book is Moby-Dick or, The Whale. Herman Melville has 674 books on Goodreads with 929566 ratings.

source: goodreads.com
Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë
Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë

Wuthering Heights and Anne Brontë's Agnes Grey were accepted by publisher Thomas Newby before the success of their sister Charlotte's novel Jane Eyre. After Emily's death, Charlotte edited the manuscript of Wuthering Heights and arranged for the edited version to be published as a posthumous second edition in 1850.

The Brothers Karamazov by Dostoevsky
The Brothers Karamazov by Dostoevsky

The Brothers Karamazov (Russian: Бра́тья Карама́зовы, Brat'ya Karamazovy, pronounced [ˈbratʲjə kərɐˈmazəvɨ]), also translated as The Karamazov Brothers, is the final novel by the Russian author Fyodor Dostoevsky.

War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy

Tolstoy said War and Peace is "not a novel, even less is it a poem, and still less a historical chronicle". Large sections, especially the later chapters, are a philosophical discussion rather than narrative. Tolstoy also said that the best Russian literature does not conform to standards and hence hesitated to call War and Peace a novel.

image: npr.org
The Wind in the Willows – Kenneth Grahame
The Wind in the Willows – Kenneth Grahame

Kenneth Grahame was a Scottish author best known for writing the children's book The Wind in the Willows. Synopsis Kenneth Grahame was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, on March 8, 1859.

source: biography.com
Lord of the Flies – William Golding
Lord of the Flies – William Golding

In Lord of the Flies, which was published in 1954, Golding combined that perception of humanity with his years of experience with schoolboys. Although not the first novel he wrote, Lord of the Flies was the first to be published after having been rejected by 21 publishers.

The Old Man and the Sea – Ernest Hemingway
The Old Man and the Sea – Ernest Hemingway

Nobel Prize winner Ernest Hemingway is seen as one of the great American 20th century novelists, and is known for works like A Farewell to Arms and The Old Man and the Sea.

source: biography.com
Animal Farm – George Orwell
Animal Farm – George Orwell

Animal Farm is an allegorical novella by George Orwell, first published in England on 17 August 1945. According to Orwell, the book reflects events leading up to the Russian Revolution of 1917 and then on into the Stalinist era of the Soviet Union.

Tuesdays With Morrie – Mitch Albom
Tuesdays With Morrie – Mitch Albom

Tuesdays with Morrie is a memoir by American writer Mitch Albom. The story was later recreated by Thomas Rickman into a TV movie of the same name directed by Mick Jackson, which aired on December 5, 1999 and starred Hank Azaria. The book topped the New York Times Non-Fiction Bestsellers of 2000.

High Fidelity – Nick Hornby
High Fidelity – Nick Hornby

High Fidelity. Bestselling author Nick Hornby explores the world of break-ups, make-ups and what it is to be in love in his astutely observed, hilarious million-copy-selling first novel High Fidelity. Do you know your desert-island, all-time, top five most memorable split-ups? Rob does. He keeps a list, in fact.

The Giver – Lois Lowry
The Giver – Lois Lowry

'The Giver' in the Lois Lowry novel of the same name is the former Receiver of Memories for the community that is tasked with training his successor. In this lesson, we will learn more about the Giver.

source: study.com
Fantastic Mr Fox – Roald Dahl
Fantastic Mr Fox – Roald Dahl

Three horrid farmers - Boggis, Bunce and Bean - hate cunning Mr Fox, who outwits them at every turn. But poor Mr Fox and his friends don't realise how determined the farmers are to get them... Roald Dahl lived with his family in Great Missenden, a village in Buckinghamshire, UK. Their house was surrounded by fields and woods.

source: roalddahl.com
Anna Karenina
Anna Karenina

Anna Karenina (Russian: «Анна Каренина», IPA: [ˈanːə kɐˈrʲenʲɪnə]) is a novel by the Russian writer Leo Tolstoy, published in serial installments from 1873 to 1877 in the periodical The Russian Messenger.

The Great Gatsby by F
The Great Gatsby by F

The Great Gatsby is a 1925 novel written by American author F. Scott Fitzgerald that follows a cast of characters living in the fictional town of West and East Egg on prosperous Long Island in the summer of 1922.

Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov
Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov

Lolita PDF is a classic novel that was written in 1955 by a Russian American Novelist named Vladimir Nabokov. What made this book to attain its classic status is its controversial subject. This novel was so successful that it was adapted into a film, not once, but twice.

Middlemarch by George Eliot
Middlemarch by George Eliot

Eliot's novel is set in the fictional town of Middlemarch, North Loamshire, which is probably based on Coventry, in the county of Warwickshire, where she had lived prior to moving to London. Like Coventry, Middlemarch is described as being a silk-ribbon manufacturing town.

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

Huckleberry Finn, inspired by a prequel (The Adventures of Tom Sawyer) that was for boys, is a book that celebrates the lost world of childhood, the space and mystery of the midwest. Above all, it mythologises the issue – race – that had tormented the Union for so many decades. So Huck Finn floats down the great river that flows through the heart of America, and on this adventure he is accompanied by the magnificent figure of Jim, a runaway slave, who is also making his bid for freedom.

The Stories of Anton Chekhov by Anton Chekhov
The Stories of Anton Chekhov by Anton Chekhov

Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (Russian: Анто́н Па́влович Че́хов, pronounced [ɐnˈton ˈpavɫəvʲɪtɕ ˈtɕɛxəf]; 29 January 1860 – 15 July 1904) was a Russian playwright and short-story …

To Kill a Mockingbird
To Kill a Mockingbird

“To Kill A Mockingbird,” considered one of the best novels of the 20th century, is also one of the most controversial. According to the American Library Association’s Office for Intellectual Freedom, the Harper Lee novel is one of the most challenged and banned classical books.

source: pbs.org
The Great Gatsby
The Great Gatsby

Gatsby's quest leads him from poverty to wealth, into the arms of his beloved, and eventually to death. Published in 1925, The Great Gatsby is a classic piece of American fiction. It is a novel of triumph and tragedy, noted for the remarkable way Fitzgerald captured a cross-section of American society.

One Hundred Years of Solitude
One Hundred Years of Solitude

One Hundred Years of Solitude (Spanish: Cien años de soledad, American Spanish: [sjen ˈaɲoz ðe soleˈðað]) is a landmark 1967 novel by Colombian author Gabriel García Márquez that tells the multi-generational story of the Buendía family, whose patriarch, José Arcadio Buendía, founds the town of Macondo, a fictitious town in the country of Colombia.

A Passage to India
A Passage to India

A Passage to India (1924) is a novel by English author E. M. Forster set against the backdrop of the British Raj and the Indian independence movement in the 1920s. It was selected as one of the 100 great works of 20th century English literature by the Modern Library and won the 1924 James Tait Black Memorial Prize for fiction.

Invisible Man
Invisible Man

Invisible Man is a novel by Ralph Ellison, ... Time magazine included the novel in its TIME 100 Best English-language Novels from 1923 to 2005, ...

Don Quixote
Don Quixote

The Ingenious Nobleman Sir Quixote of La Mancha (El Ingenioso Hidalgo Don Quijote de la Mancha, pronounced [el iŋxeˈnjoso iˈðalɣo ðoŋ kiˈxote ðe la ˈmantʃa]), or just Don Quixote (/ ˌ d ɒ n k iː ˈ h oʊ t i /; Spanish: [don kiˈxote] ( listen)), is a Spanish novel by Miguel de Cervantes.

image: purdue.edu
Beloved
Beloved

Beloved is a 1987 novel by the American writer Toni Morrison. Set after the American Civil War (1861–65), it is inspired by the story of an African-American slave, Margaret Garner, who escaped slavery in Kentucky late January 1856 by fleeing to Ohio, a free state.

image: npr.org