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Top Ten Novels in the World

Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy

Tolstoy's style in Anna Karenina is considered by many critics to be transitional, forming a bridge between the realist and modernist novel. The novel is narrated from a third-person-omniscient perspective, shifting the narrator's attention to several major characters, though most frequently focusing on the opposing lifestyles and attitudes of its central protagonists of Anna and Levin.

Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert

Madame Bovary (full French title: Madame Bovary. Mœurs de province) is the debut novel of French writer Gustave Flaubert, published in 1856. The character lives beyond her means in order to escape the banalities and emptiness of provincial life.

War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy
War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy

Tolstoy also said that the best Russian literature does not conform to standards and hence hesitated to call War and Peace a novel. Instead, he regarded Anna Karenina as his first true novel. The Encyclopædia Britannica states: "It can be argued that no single English novel attains the universality of the Russian writer Leo Tolstoy's War and Peace".

image: npr.org
THE GREAT GATSBY by F
THE GREAT GATSBY by F

The Great Gatsby is a 1925 novel written by American author F. Scott Fitzgerald that follows a cast of characters living in the fictional town of West and East Egg on prosperous Long Island in the summer of 1922.

image: genius.com
LOLITA by Vladimir Nabokov
LOLITA by Vladimir Nabokov

Nabokov's Lolita (1955), his most noted novel in English, was ranked fourth in the list of the Modern Library 100 Best Novels; Pale Fire (1962) was ranked 53rd on the same list, and his memoir, Speak, Memory (1951), was listed eighth on the publisher's list of the 20th century's greatest nonfiction.

Middlemarch by George Eliot
Middlemarch by George Eliot

George Eliot's masterpiece, Middlemarch, appeared after the deaths of Thackeray (1863) and Dickens (1870). This is hardly an accident. Subtitled "a study of provincial life", the novel has a didactic realism that's a world away from Vanity Fair or Great Expectations.

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

A summary of Themes in Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans.

The Stories of Anton Chekhov by Anton Chekhov
The Stories of Anton Chekhov by Anton Chekhov

About The Complete Short Novels. Anton Chekhov, widely hailed as the supreme master of the short story, also wrote five works long enough to be called short novels–here brought together in one volume for the first time, in a masterly new translation by the award-winning translators Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky.

The Wind in the Willows – Kenneth Grahame
The Wind in the Willows – Kenneth Grahame

The Wind in the Willows is a children's novel by Kenneth Grahame, first published in 1908. Alternately slow-moving and fast-paced, it focuses on four anthropomorphised animals in a pastoral version of Edwardian England.

image: epublib.info
Lord of the Flies – William Golding
Lord of the Flies – William Golding

Lord of the Flies is a 1954 novel by Nobel Prize–winning British author William Golding. The book focuses on a group of British boys stranded on an uninhabited island and their disastrous attempt to govern themselves.

The Old Man and the Sea – Ernest Hemingway
The Old Man and the Sea – Ernest Hemingway

Nobel Prize winner Ernest Hemingway is seen as one of the great American 20th century novelists, and is known for works like A Farewell to Arms and The Old Man and the Sea.

source: biography.com
image: buzzfeed.com
Animal Farm – George Orwell
Animal Farm – George Orwell

He began to write novels, ... Second World War and Animal Farm ... A Multifaceted view of George Orwell as champion of the common man, ...

image: onedio.co
Tuesdays With Morrie – Mitch Albom
Tuesdays With Morrie – Mitch Albom

Tuesdays with Morrie is a magical chronicle of their time together, through which Mitch shares Morrie’s lasting gift with the world. Now the best-selling memoir of all time,Tuesdays with Morrie began as a modest labor of love to help pay some of Schwartz’s medical bills.

High Fidelity – Nick Hornby
High Fidelity – Nick Hornby

High Fidelity. Bestselling author Nick Hornby explores the world of break-ups, make-ups and what it is to be in love in his astutely observed, hilarious million-copy-selling first novel High Fidelity. Do you know your desert-island, all-time, top five most memorable split-ups? Rob does. He keeps a list, in fact.

The Giver – Lois Lowry
The Giver – Lois Lowry

The Giver is a 1993 American young adult dystopian novel by Lois Lowry. It is set in a society which at first appears to be utopian but is revealed to be dystopian as the story progresses. The novel follows a 12-year-old boy named Jonas.

Fantastic Mr Fox – Roald Dahl
Fantastic Mr Fox – Roald Dahl

During the making of the film version of Fantastic Mr Fox, Wes Anderson returned to the Great Missenden countryside that had inspired the original story, staying with Roald's widow Felicity "Liccy" Dahl while he wrote the screenplay. In the original book Mr and Mrs Fox don't have first names, but in his version Wes gave Mrs Fox the name Felicity.

source: roalddahl.com
ULYSSES by James Joyce
ULYSSES by James Joyce

Is James Joyce's Ulysses the hardest novel to finish? James Joyce died 75 years ago this week, leaving a lifetime of books beloved by many... and Ulysses, heralded as both the best novel in the English language and the hardest to read.

BRAVE NEW WORLD by Aldous Huxley
BRAVE NEW WORLD by Aldous Huxley

Brave New World is a dystopian novel by English author Aldous Huxley. Published in 1932, it propounds that economic chaos and unemployment will cause a radical reaction in the form of an international scientific empire that manufactures its citizens in the laboratory on a eugenic basis, without the need for human intercourse.

THE SOUND AND THE FURY by William Faulkner
THE SOUND AND THE FURY by William Faulkner

The Sound and the Fury is a novel written by the American author William Faulkner. It employs a number of narrative styles, including stream of consciousness. Published in 1929, The Sound and the Fury was Faulkner's fourth novel, and was not immediately successful.

image: abebooks.com
CATCH-22 by Joseph Heller
CATCH-22 by Joseph Heller

Catch-22 is a satirical novel by American author Joseph Heller. He began writing it in 1953; the novel was first published in 1961. Often cited as one of the most significant novels of the twentieth century, it uses a distinctive non-chronological third-person omniscient narration, describing events from the points of view of different characters.

DARKNESS AT NOON by Arthur Koestler
DARKNESS AT NOON by Arthur Koestler

Koestler wrote Darkness at Noon as the second part of a trilogy: the first volume was The Gladiators (1939), first published in Hungarian. It was a novel about the subversion of the Spartacus revolt. The third novel was Arrival and Departure (1943), about a refugee during World War II.

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