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Types of Accents

Case Grammar
Case Grammar

Accents are not just regional but sometimes contain information about a person's ethnicity, such as in the case of nonnative English speakers; education; or economic status. "Within each national variety [of English] the standard dialect is relatively homogeneous in grammar, vocabulary, spelling, and punctuation.

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Cognitive Grammar
Cognitive Grammar

By addressing cognitive skills, a speech pathologist can help you improve household management (paying bills, taking medication, cooking, etc.), facilitate return to work (organizing projects, meeting client, using a computer, etc.) and increase independence in the community (grocery shopping, using public transportation, visiting with friends, etc.).

Comparative Grammar
Comparative Grammar

If you understand this, you already know what a comparative and a superlative are. Words that compare one thing to another (e.g., better, older) are called comparatives. Words that put something at the top or bottom of the class, so to speak, (e.g., best, oldest) are called superlatives.

Construction Grammar
Construction Grammar

In construction grammar, a grammatical construction, regardless of its formal or semantic complexity and make up, is a pairing of form and meaning. Thus words and word classes may be regarded as instances of constructions.

Descriptive and Prescriptive Grammar
Descriptive and Prescriptive Grammar

A descriptive grammar is built up by analyzing how speakers use a language, and deducing the rules they are following. A prescriptive grammar is a set of explicit rules for using language that are taught, or enforced, so that people will use the language in a particular way.

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Generative Grammar
Generative Grammar

Generative grammar is a linguistic theory that regards grammar as a system of rules that generates exactly those combinations of words that form grammatical sentences in a given language. Noam Chomsky first used the term in relation to the theoretical linguistics of grammar that he developed in the late 1950s.

Lexical-Functional Grammar (LFG)
Lexical-Functional Grammar (LFG)

In linguistics, lexical-functional grammar is a model of grammar that provides a framework for examining both morphological structures and syntactic structures.

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Lexicogrammar
Lexicogrammar

Lexicogrammar is a term used in systemic functional linguistics (SFL) to emphasize the interdependence of--and continuity between--vocabulary (lexis) and syntax (grammar). The term lexicogrammar (literally, lexicon plus grammar) was introduced by linguist M.A.K. Halliday.

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