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Types of Anxiety Disorders

Agoraphobia
Agoraphobia

Panic disorder and agoraphobia. Some people have a panic disorder in addition to agoraphobia. Panic disorder is a type of anxiety disorder in which you experience sudden attacks of extreme fear that reach a peak within a few minutes and trigger intense physical symptoms (panic attacks). You might think that you're totally losing control, having a heart attack or even dying.

Bipolar Disorder
Bipolar Disorder

Bipolar disorder, also known as manic-depressive illness, is a brain disorder that causes unusual shifts in mood, energy, activity levels, and the ability to carry out day-to-day tasks.

source: nimh.nih.gov
Dysthymia
Dysthymia

Dysthymia, now known as persistent depressive disorder (PDD), is a mood disorder consisting of the same cognitive and physical problems as depression, with less severe but longer-lasting symptoms. The concept was coined by Robert Spitzer as a replacement for the term "depressive personality" in the late 1970s.

Generalized Anxiety Disorder
Generalized Anxiety Disorder

Generalized anxiety disorder (or GAD) is characterized by excessive, exaggerated anxiety and worry about everyday life events with no obvious reasons for worry. People with symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder tend to always expect disaster and can't stop worrying about health, money, family, work, or school.

source: webmd.com
Major Depression
Major Depression

Major depression, also known as unipolar or major depressive disorder, is characterized by a persistent feeling of sadness or a lack of interest in outside stimuli. The unipolar connotes a difference between major depression and bipolar depression, which refers to an oscillating state between depression and mania.

source: psycom.net
Mood Disorder Related to Another Health Condition
Mood Disorder Related to Another Health Condition

Illness under mood disorders include: major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder (mania - euphoric, hyperactive, over inflated ego, unrealistic optimism), persistent depressive disorder (long lasting low grade depression), cyclothymia (a mild form of bipolar disorder), and SAD (seasonal affective disorder).

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. Definition. Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a common, chronic and long-lasting disorder in which a person has uncontrollable, reoccurring thoughts (obsessions) and behaviors (compulsions) that he or she feels the urge to repeat over and over.

source: nimh.nih.gov
Panic Disorder
Panic Disorder

If this kind of random event has happened to you at least twice, and you constantly worry and change your routine to keep from having one, you might have panic disorder -- a type of anxiety disorder. One in 10 adults in the U.S. have panic attacks each year. About a third of people have one in their lifetime.

source: webmd.com
Phobias
Phobias

Social anxiety disorder. Also called social phobia, this is when you feel overwhelming worry and self-consciousness about everyday social situations. You fixate about others judging you or on being embarrassed or ridiculed. Specific phobias. You feel intense fear of a specific object or situation, such as heights or flying.

source: webmd.com
image: avxhome.se
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) The main treatments for people with PTSD are medications, psychotherapy (“talk” therapy), or both.

source: nimh.nih.gov
Social Phobia
Social Phobia

Social anxiety disorder is often confused with shyness. ... Social anxiety disorder (also known as social phobia) is one of the most common mental disorders, ...

source: webmd.com
Social Phobia (or Social Anxiety Disorder)
Social Phobia (or Social Anxiety Disorder)

Social anxiety disorder is often confused with shyness. ... Social Phobia; Is social anxiety disorder ... Can Anxiety Disorders Be Cured?

source: webmd.com
Substance-Induced Mood Disorder
Substance-Induced Mood Disorder

Substance-Induced Mood Disorders. The most common psychiatric co-occurring disorders are substance abuse and mood disorders. It is common for people with mood disorders to turn to substance abuse. The substance abuse, in turn, exacerbates the effects of the mood disorder.