A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Types of Apraxia

Apraxia of Speech
Apraxia of Speech

Developmental apraxia of speech is also known as childhood apraxia of speech. This condition is present from birth, and it affects a child's ability to form sounds and words. Children with speech apraxia often have far greater abilities to understand speech than to express themselves with spoken words.

source: webmd.com
Developmental Verbal Dyspraxia
Developmental Verbal Dyspraxia

Learn why childhood apraxia of speech is sometimes called verbal dyspraxia. Find out what the difference is between apraxia and dyspraxia of speech. An expert explains.

Dysarthria
Dysarthria

Apraxia vs Dysarthria A speech disorder, or an impediment is where the normal speech pattern is affected, and verbal communication is adversely affected, or completely nullified. It may range from stuttering, cluttering, muteness to voice disorders.

Orofacial Myofunctional Disorders
Orofacial Myofunctional Disorders

Orofacial Myofunctional Disorders (OMD) What are they ? With OMD, the tongue moves forward in an exaggerated way during speech and/or swallowing. The tongue may lie too far forward during rest or may protrude between the upper and lower teeth during speech and swallowing, and at rest.

Specific Language Impairment
Specific Language Impairment

Interventions for specific language impairment will be based upon the individual difficulties in which the impairment manifests. For example, if the child is incapable of separating individual morphemes, or units of sound, in speech, then the interventions may take the form of rhyming, or of tapping on each syllable.

Speech Sound Disorder
Speech Sound Disorder

Apraxia of speech (AOS)—also known as acquired apraxia of speech, verbal apraxia, or childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) when diagnosed in children—is a speech sound disorder. Someone with AOS has trouble saying what he or she wants to say correctly and consistently.

source: nidcd.nih.gov
Stuttering
Stuttering

My first recommendation, when disfluency erupts in children with apraxia who have not demonstrated prior disfluent speech, is: “Dont panic.” As difficult as it is to hear a child struggle intensely with fluency control, I have seen many children with very severe rapid onset of disfluency “move out of it” either as quickly as it began, or over time without any “direct” focus.