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Types of Argument Fallacies

Ad Hominem
Ad Hominem

Ad hominem (Latin for "to the man" or "to the person"), short for argumentum ad hominem, is a fallacious argumentative strategy whereby genuine discussion of the topic at hand is avoided by instead attacking the character, motive, or other attribute of the person making the argument, or persons associated with the argument, rather than attacking the substance of the argument itself.

Affirming the Consequent
Affirming the Consequent

Consequent: the propositional component of a conditional proposition whose truth is conditional; or simply put, what comes after the “then” in an “if/then” statement. Antecedent: the propositional component of a conditional proposition whose truth is the condition for the truth of the consequent; or simply put, what comes after the “if” in an “if/then” statement.

Argument From Authority
Argument From Authority

Generally, the argument from authority or false authority, is an argument from an authority, but on a topic outside of the particular authority’s expertise or on a topic on which the authority is not disinterested (i.e., is biased).

Argument From Ignorance or Non-Testable Hypothesis
Argument From Ignorance or Non-Testable Hypothesis

Opposite of ad hominem- argument is advanced because of those advancing it. Argument from Ignorance/Non Testable Hypothesis That not proven false must be true- usually applies to things that can't be proven- ex. "innocent until proven guilty".

source: quizlet.com
Band Wagon
Band Wagon

A genuine instance of the bandwagon fallacy is the argument that you should vote for a certain candidate because the majority of people support that candidate, or the candidate is popular. This is the origin of the phrase "to jump on the bandwagon".

Begging the Question or Circular Argument
Begging the Question or Circular Argument

Description: Any form of argument where the conclusion is assumed in one of the premises. Many people use the phrase “begging the question” incorrectly when they use it to mean, “prompts one to ask the question”. That is NOT the correct usage. Begging the question is a form of circular reasoning. Logical Form: Claim X assumes X is true.

Dogmatism
Dogmatism

Dogmatism: The Art of Not Thinking Example 1 The Definition When we assume or assert that a particular position is the only possible acceptable one.

source: prezi.com