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Types of Arthritis

Anterior Achilles Tendon Bursitis
Anterior Achilles Tendon Bursitis

Bursitis is often differentiated from the fracture by the localization of warmth and swelling contiguous to the tendon and pain localized primarily in the soft tissue. Also, using the thumb and index finger, compressing side-to-side anterior to the Achilles tendon causes pain.

Arthritis Mutilans
Arthritis Mutilans

Arthritis mutilans is a rare medical condition involving severe inflammation damaging the joints of the hands and feet, and resulting in deformation and problems with moving the affected areas; it can also affect the spine.

Asymmetric Arthritis
Asymmetric Arthritis

Asymmetric arthritis typically involves one to three joints in the body -- large or small -- such as the knee, hip, or one or several fingers. Asymmetric psoriatic arthritis does not affect matching pairs of joints on opposite sides of the body.

source: webmd.com
Back Pain
Back Pain

Many forms of arthritis and related conditions that affect the joints, muscles and/or bones can cause problems like pain, stiffness and swelling in the back. While any part of the back can be affected, the lower back is the most common site of arthritis back pain, most likely because it bears more of the body's weight.

source: arthritis.org
Deformity of Joints
Deformity of Joints

Severe deformities lead to loss of joint function and the need for joint replacement surgery. Risk factors for the development of deformities include high levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation in the body, and rheumatoid factor (RF), an antibody (a special protein made by the immune system) present in the blood of many people with RA.

source: arthritis.org
image: nlm.nih.gov
Distal Interphalangeal Predominant (DIP)
Distal Interphalangeal Predominant (DIP)

Distal interphalangeal predominant psoriatic arthritis or DIP for short is a sub-type of psoriatic arthritis. This variety of psoriatic arthritis is characterized by inflammation and/or stiffness in the joints at the tips or very end digit of the fingers and toes.

Elbow Bursitis
Elbow Bursitis

Bursitis is the inflammation or irritation of the bursa. The bursa is a sac filled with lubricating fluid, located between tissues such as bone, muscle, tendons, and skin, that decreases rubbing, friction, and irritation. What Causes Bursitis? Bursitis is most often caused by repetitive, minor impact on the area, or from a sudden, more serious injury.

source: webmd.com
image: webmd.com
Fibromyalgia
Fibromyalgia

Fibromyalgia affects more than 3.7 million Americans, the majority of whom are women between the ages of 40 and 75, but it also affects men, young women and children. People with other rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis or lupus, are at greater risk for fibromyalgia.

source: arthritis.org
image: hubpages.com
Gout
Gout

Gout is actually a form of arthritis. It is the body's reaction to irritating crystal deposits in the joints. The pain can be intense, but treatment usually works very well.

source: webmd.com
Grinding Sensations
Grinding Sensations

My online research seems to indicate that there are two likely causes for this grinding sensation in the knee. One reason is that the cartilage in the knee is dry and tough, and that in most cases this can be temporarily relieved with a joint lubrication injection.

Hip Bursitis
Hip Bursitis

What Is Bursitis? Bursitis is the ... An abnormal or poorly placed bone or joint (such as length differences in your legs or arthritis in a joint) can put added stress on a bursa sac, causing bursitis. Stress or inflammation from other conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis, gout, psoriatic arthritis, thyroid disorders, or unusual medication reactions may also increase a person's risk. In ...

source: webmd.com
Joint Pain
Joint Pain

Actually, “arthritis” is not a single disease; it is an informal way of referring to joint pain or joint disease. There are more than 100 different types of arthritis and related conditions. People of all ages, sexes and races can and do have arthritis, and it is the leading cause of disability in America.

source: arthritis.org
Joint Swelling
Joint Swelling

Joint swelling is common with different types of arthritis, infections, and injuries. A swollen joint is a symptom of the following health conditions: Osteoarthritis (OA). OA is the "wear-and-tear" arthritis that usually happens with aging or after injury. With OA, there's a wearing down of the cartilage that cushions the ends of the bones.

source: webmd.com
Joint Tenderness
Joint Tenderness

Arthritis is very common but is not well understood. Actually, “arthritis” is not a single disease; it is an informal way of referring to joint pain or joint disease. There are more than 100 different types of arthritis and related conditions.

source: arthritis.org
Lumps and Bumps Around Joints
Lumps and Bumps Around Joints

Do they move around? Some nodules can move. Others stay firmly in place because they're connected to tendons or other bands of tissue called fascia under the skin.

source: webmd.com
Lupus
Lupus

Lupus is a chronic, autoimmune disease that affects various parts of the body, including joints, kidneys and other organs, skin, blood and even the brain. Lupus is a chronic, autoimmune disease that affects various parts of the body, including joints, kidneys and other organs, skin, blood and even the brain.

source: arthritis.org
Osteoarthritis
Osteoarthritis

Sometimes called degenerative joint disease or “wear and tear” arthritis, osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common chronic condition of the joints. It occurs when the cartilage or cushion between joints breaks down leading to pain, stiffness and swelling. pain.

source: arthritis.org
Other Musculoskeletal Pain
Other Musculoskeletal Pain

rheumatoid arthritis (RA) fibromyalgia; bone fractures; MSDs are common. And your risk of developing them increases with age. The severity of MSDs can vary. In some cases, they cause pain and discomfort that interferes with everyday activities. Early diagnosis and treatment may help ease symptoms and improve long-term outlook.

image: medscape.org
Posterior Achilles Tendon Bursitis
Posterior Achilles Tendon Bursitis

Posterior Achilles tendon bursitis is inflammation of a bursa that forms in response to shoe pressure and is located at the top edge of the posterior shoe counter between the skin and Achilles tendon.

Psoriatic Arthritis
Psoriatic Arthritis

Psoriatic arthritis is a form of inflammatory arthritis that can affect some of the millions of Americans who have psoriasis. Psoriasis is a skin disease that causes a red, scaly rash, most commonly over the elbows, knees, ankles, feet, hands, and other areas.

source: webmd.com
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease in which the body’s immune system – which normally protects its health by attacking foreign substances like bacteria and viruses – mistakenly attacks the joints.

source: arthritis.org
Spondylitis
Spondylitis

Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a type of inflammatory arthritis that primarily affects the spine or back. In AS, the joints and ligaments along the spine become inflamed. The inflammation produces pain and stiffness that usually begins in the lower back or buttocks, and may progress into the upper spine, chest and neck.

source: arthritis.org
Stiffness of Joints
Stiffness of Joints

Stiffness can affect any joint– the fingers and hands, wrists, elbows, knees, ankles, feet, shoulders, hips, and even the jaw. Know Your Symptoms Other signs and symptoms in addition to the inflammation and stiffness will help your doctor figure out what kind of arthritis you have.

source: arthritis.org
Symmetric Arthritis
Symmetric Arthritis

Are there different types of psoriatic arthritis? Symmetric psoriatic arthritis: Symmetric arthritis affects the same joints -- usually in multiple matching pairs -- on opposite sides of the ... Asymmetric psoriatic arthritis: Asymmetric arthritis typically involves one to three joints in the body -- large or small -- such as the ...

source: webmd.com
Warm/Red Joints
Warm/Red Joints

Different forms of arthritis are the most common causes of joints that feel warm. Two chief arthritis types exist: rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA). RA is an autoimmune disorder in which the immune system attacks the cells in your joints.

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