A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Types of Artificial Sweeteners

Acesulfame K
Acesulfame K

Acesulfame potassium (/ ˌ eɪ s iː ˈ s ʌ l f eɪ m / AY-see-SUL-faym), also known as acesulfame K (K is the symbol for potassium) or Ace K, is a calorie-free sugar substitute (artificial sweetener) often marketed under the trade names Sunett and Sweet One.

image: pixelrz.com
Acesulfame Potassium - Sunnett, Sweet One
Acesulfame Potassium - Sunnett, Sweet One

It will be listed as acesulfame potassium, acesulfame K, or Ace-K, according to the FDA. It could also be labeled under the brand names Sunnett or Sweet One. Because it’s a non-sugar sweetener, you will largely find it in sugar-free or low-sugar products. Diet sodas may be sweetened with a combination of Ace-K and other artificial sweeteners.

Acesulfame-K — "Safe
Acesulfame-K — "Safe

Acesulfame potassium is a calorie-free sweetener with a sour reputation. It can be found in many different foods, but is it safe? Acesulfame potassium is a calorie-free sweetener with a sour reputation.

Aspartame - Nutrasweet, Equal
Aspartame - Nutrasweet, Equal

Aspartame is one of the most common artificial sweeteners in use today. It is sold under the brand names NutraSweet ® and Equal ®. Aspartame is made by joining together the amino acids aspartic acid and phenylalanine. Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins and are found naturally in many foods.

source: cancer.org
Aspartame — "Safe"
Aspartame — "Safe"

Aspartame is one of the most common artificial sweeteners in use today. It is sold under the brand names NutraSweet ® and Equal ®. Aspartame is made by joining together the amino acids aspartic acid and phenylalanine. Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins and are found naturally in many foods.

source: cancer.org
Aspartame (Equal, NutraSweet, NatraTaste Blue)
Aspartame (Equal, NutraSweet, NatraTaste Blue)

Aspartame. Brand names: Equal, NutraSweet, NatraTaste Blue *Color of the packets: Blue. How many times sweeter than sugar? 160-220. Who should not use the product? People with a rare hereditary condition called phenylketonuria (PKU) cannot metabolize phenylalanine (an amino acid in aspartame). They should keep track of the amount of aspartame they are consuming.

image: draxe.com
But are low
But are low

If you're trying to lose weight or prevent weight gain, products sweetened with artificial sweeteners, rather than with higher calorie table sugar, may be an attractive option. On the other hand, some research has suggested that consuming artificial sweeteners may be associated with increased weight, but the cause is not yet known. Diabetes.

image: qz.com
Neotame - N/A
Neotame - N/A

Neotame is a relatively new artificial sweetener that has yet to become a household name like aspartame (Nutrasweet), sucralose (Splenda) and saccharin (Sweet 'n Low). This high-intensity sweetener was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2002 as an artificial sweetener and flavor enhancer.

source: sixwise.com
image: alibaba.com
Saccharin
Saccharin

Now more than 125 years later, saccharin is joined by a growing list of artificial sweeteners with varying chemical structures and uses, including acesulfame potassium (Sunett, Sweet One); aspartame (NutraSweet, Equal, Advantame); neotame (Newtame), and sucralose (Splenda).

source: webmd.com
Saccharin — "Safe"
Saccharin — "Safe"

Now more than 125 years later, saccharin is joined by a growing list of artificial sweeteners with varying chemical structures and uses, including acesulfame potassium (Sunett, Sweet One); aspartame (NutraSweet, Equal, Advantame); neotame (Newtame), and sucralose (Splenda).

source: webmd.com
Saccharin (Sweet 'N Low, Sweet Twin)
Saccharin (Sweet 'N Low, Sweet Twin)

Because many artificial sweeteners are actually much sweeter than sugar, frequent or heavy use may lead to a preference for supersweet foods. For example, sucralose (Splenda) is 600 times as sweet as sugar; aspartame (NutraSweet, Equal) is 180 times as sweet as sugar; and saccharin (Sweet'N Low, Sweet Twin) is 300 times as sweet as sugar.

Stevia — "Safe"
Stevia — "Safe"

Studies on stevia in those forms raise concerns about the control of blood sugar and effects on the reproductive, cardiovascular, and renal systems, the FDA warns. However, the FDA has allowed companies to use Rebaudioside A, an isolated chemical from stevia, as a food additive in their sweetener products.

Stevia/Rebaudioside
Stevia/Rebaudioside

Americans now can get their calorie-free sugar fix from an all-natural alternative to artificial sweeteners. Once limited to the health-food market as an unapproved herb, the plant-derived sweetener known as stevia is now widely available and rapidly replacing artificial sweeteners in consumer products.

image: alibaba.com
Sucralose - Splenda
Sucralose - Splenda

Sucralose is a zero-calorie artificial sweetener, and Splenda is the most common sucralose-based product. Sucralose is made from sugar, in a multi-step chemical process where 3 hydrogen-oxygen groups are replaced with chlorine atoms.

Sucralose — "Safe"
Sucralose — "Safe"

Now more than 125 years later, saccharin is joined by a growing list of artificial sweeteners with varying chemical structures and uses, including acesulfame potassium (Sunett, Sweet One); aspartame (NutraSweet, Equal, Advantame); neotame (Newtame), and sucralose (Splenda).

source: webmd.com
Sugar Alcohols (Xylitol) — "Safe"
Sugar Alcohols (Xylitol) — "Safe"

The common sugar alcohols – sorbitol, mannitol, maltitol, erythritol, and hydrogenated starch hydrolysates – are manufactured from cornstarch. Xylitol, another common sugar alcohol, is manufactured from such sources as corn cobs, sugar cane bagasse (stalk residue remaining after sugar extraction), or birch wood waste.

source: sugar.org
Xylitol, Sorbitol
Xylitol, Sorbitol

Artificial sweeteners, or non-nutritive sweeteners as they are sometimes referred to, have been controversial since they were first introduced to the market in the 1950s, and scientific research shows they are associated with many dangerous side effects.

source: draxe.com