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Types of Author's Purpose

Man vs Fate/Supernatural
Man vs Fate/Supernatural

Man against man "Man against man" conflict involves stories where characters are against each other. This is an external conflict. The conflict may be direct opposition, as in a gunfight or a robbery, or it may be a more subtle conflict between the desires of two or more characters, as in a romance or a family epic.

image: buzzle.com
Man vs Machine
Man vs Machine

"Man against man" conflict involves stories where characters are against each other. This is an external conflict. The conflict may be direct opposition, as in a gunfight or a robbery, or it may be a more subtle conflict between the desires of two or more characters, as in a romance or a family epic.

Man vs Man
Man vs Man

Author's Purpose Basics. The author's purpose is basically the reason he or she chose to act in a particular way, whether that's writing the passage, selecting a phrase, using a word, etc. It differs from the main idea in that author's purpose not the point you're supposed to get or understand; rather, it's the why behind why the author picked up a pen or selected those words in the first place.

source: thoughtco.com
image: youtube.com
Man vs Nature
Man vs Nature

Man against nature "Man against nature" conflict is an external struggle positioning the hero against an animal or a force of nature, such as a storm or tornado or snow. The "man against nature" conflict is central to Ernest Hemingway's The Old Man and the Sea, where the protagonist contends against a marlin.

Man vs Self
Man vs Self

Man vs. Wild not only takes its name from this conflict, but it is also a great example, featuring Bear Grylls and his attempts to keep nature at bay. Man against self. With "man against self" conflict, the struggle is internal.

image: onsizzle.com
Man vs Society
Man vs Society

Where man stands against a man-made institution (such as slavery or bullying), "man against man" conflict may shade into "man against society". In such stories, characters are forced to make moral choices or frustrated by social rules in meeting their own goals. The Handmaid's Tale and Fahrenheit 451 are examples of "man against society" conflicts.